Linux maturity reflected in site analysis

Linux maturity reflected in site analysis

Summary: Blogging at LinuxWorld yesterday, I didn't expect to see the circus on the Expo floor, replete with contract models hired as exhibitors, mascots, swarms of polo and khaki types playing video games, and a mechanical bull. But it's a sure sign that times are changing for Linux.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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TraxBlogging at LinuxWorld yesterday, I didn't expect to see the circus on the Expo floor, replete with contract models hired as exhibitors, mascots, swarms of polo and khaki types playing video games, and a mechanical bull. But it's a sure sign that times are changing for Linux.

A BT Trax analysis of all Linux-tagged content consumed on News.com, ZDNet News, and the IT Papers directory over the last seven quarters shows that news buzz (the product of headlines and page views) has dropped significantly since this time a year ago. At the same time consumption of Linux white papers, case studies, and Webcasts increased considerably, particularly in the final quarter of 2004. Since then, however, the traction has also been slipping and now it’s on a similar slope as news interest. 

So what does it mean? Well, in the case of news, the big headlines of the past, such as the SCO controversy and Linux vs. Microsoft TCO studies, generated the kind of buzz that hasn’t been touched so far in 2005.  And that awareness helped drive attention into the IT directory where many companies were actively promoting their marketing content. But as the data suggests, it looks like most IT pros that needed to weigh in Linux for their orgnizations have already done so by now, and are in some stage of Linux or open source deployment. 
  
Linux_trax.GIF

Topic: Open Source

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  • And everyone who looked at Linux...

    ... decided it was the best solution, convinced his employer promptly, and is now happily and successfully deploying the software.

    How do I know? Well, ZDNet says so.

    People have begun reading ZDNet facts to their small children. The subject matter may be fantastic, but the children do go right to sleep.

    Quoting:
    But as the data suggests, it looks like most IT pros that needed to weigh in Linux for their orgnizations have already done so by now, and are in some stage of Linux or open source deployment.
    Anton Philidor
    • RE: And everyone who looked at Linux...

      Accept the inevitable Anton... Linux is here and it's here to stay. Get over it, accept it and use what you wish.

      But for many thousands, nay millions of people, Linux is providing a solid and reliable cost effective solution. It's just how it is. And people are making money with it! I know I am!
      Linux User 147560
      • Okay.

        But would you make the same claim, that the reason for lowered interest is that everyone who had looked at Linux-related articles in the past is in process of installing it?

        I think even as a Linux supporter you wouldn't be that blythe.
        Anton Philidor
        • Give and take

          I actually agree with Anton that the logic of the premise under discussion, i.e., that a decreased demand for information about a product must mean that everyone who has read the information, is now installing it. Bad logic, bad reporting. On the other hand, Microsoft's "Get The Facts" campaign is a tissue of half-truths and distortions, and in the UK, where the standard and veracity of adverts is actually monitored, they were made to pull it. Microsoft certainly can give it out - how many billions of $$$ do they spend on advertising, PR and astro-turfers? Perhaps the real problem here is that the Microsoft party faithful don't like the feeling that follows being deceived ... in which case, there's a sort of poetic justice when one of them complains about it !
          whisperycat
        • how I came to that claim

          Anton,

          I said it "it looks like," and not "everyone" but "most" IT pros. Maybe it is not THOSE exact people who are migrating to Linux, but given how many responses we get each month from our users listing Linux as a top IT priority in our surveys, I wouldn't say my conclusions are off the mark.

          Chris
          Chris
          chris jablonski
          • Interpretation

            The quote in question:
            But as the data suggests, it looks like most IT pros that needed to weigh in Linux for their orgnizations have already done so by now, and are in some stage of Linux or open source deployment.

            This is a single sentence, and I don't want to over-emphasize it. Still, it is the guidance to the reader about how to understand the raw data which has been presented, and so should be justified by what has been learned.

            To me, it isn't.

            I notice that in the justification you've provided, which I much appreciate your taking the time to do, you refer to another fact which was not originally presented. ("... given how many responses we get each month from our users listing Linux as a top IT priority...")

            That's not appropriate, I think, because the reader should be able to look at the facts presented and evaluate what you've stated by following the logic you applied.

            You also included an inherent inference which was a large leap. Quoting again:

            ... most IT pros that needed to weigh in Linux for their orgnizations have already done so by now ...

            There are other IT pros, the ones who did not "need to weigh in [on] Linux". Why did they not "need to weigh in"?
            Presuming that they favored Linux, and there is no mention of IT pros who do not favor Linux, the reason they did not "need to weigh in" must have been that they were able to implement Linux without having to make an elaborate sales pitch.

            The contention that everyone who did investigate Linux implements it is tacit support for the idea that all other IT pros implemented Linux without investigation/documentation.

            These are a lot more words than the original statement. But I think they're necessary to demonstrate that you were propagandizing rather than assisting the reader.
            Unintentionally, I'm sure.

            I'm also sure that when the financial results for various companies are published for this time period, we will find out that some IT pros somewhere chose alternatives to Linux.


            Oh, and "it looks like" Linux is being chosen by many companies?
            Please remember that the facts you're explaining to readers show a reduction in interest in Linux. Your argument is against what "it looks like" and not the obvious conclusion, that there is less interest in Linux.
            Anton Philidor
      • What's more..

        Is "open source" being the buzz. I hear it all the time even in politics as in an open source information unit in the CIA. It's about having control over exchanging information. There are all kinds of things going on now in open source.

        Linux offers that freedom and others like Sun and Apple are following. Of course, this doesn't leave MS behind (not yet anyway). Linux fits in everywhere. We can load open source applications on routers, game boxes, and more to come.

        Cost is a factor and something we talk about and compair all the time. But it's not always about money$$. Open source allows people to be inventive in their own environments and that's a good feeling!

        MS won't own the Internet and it's going to have a hard time owning the hand held and other appliance markets. People want to "exchange" information without having to worry about other applications (like browsers) being compatible or not. These days are comming to an end since Linux "is" here to stay and people like me and you are making money. Something Anton will have to except sooner or later.
        xstep
  • What's the diff?

    I believe that the data shows that in the past, IT management didn't know much about Linux and was wondering what all the buzz was about. Now it looks like they understand that Linux has potential and are researching what it does and how it works. A paradigm shift may be comming . . .
    Roger Ramjet
  • But market is swinging towards Mac/FreeBSD

    What happened to the story that Mac is gaining!

    http://www.computerworld.com/softwaretopics/os/macos/story/0,10801,103438,00.html
    Wagadonga