Apple patches 10 iPhone security holes

Apple patches 10 iPhone security holes

Summary: Apple has shipped an iPhone software update to patch 10 different vulnerabilities that could allow malicious hackers to launch executable code, steal e-mail credentials or take control of the device's phone-dialing capabilities.

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Apple patches 10 iPhone security holesApple has shipped an iPhone software update to patch 10 different vulnerabilities that could allow malicious hackers to launch executable code, steal e-mail credentials or take control of the device's phone-dialing capabilities.

The mega-patch, which shipped today as iPhone v1.1.1, patches seven holes in Safari, a code execution and denial-of-service bug in Bluetooth, and two flaws affecting the built-in Mail service.

The skinny, via Apple's advisory:

Bluetooth (CVE-2007-3753) -- An input validation issue in the iPhone's Bluetooth server could allow the use of maliciously-crafted Service Discovery Protocol (SDP) packets to trigger an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution.

Mail (CVE-2007-3754 and CVE-2007-3755) -- When Mail is configured to use SSL for incoming and outgoing connections, it does not warn the user when the identity of the mail server has changed or cannot be trusted. An attacker capable of intercepting the connection may be able to impersonate the user's mail server and obtain the user's email credentials or other sensitive information. Separately, following a telephone ("tel:") link in Mail will dial a phone number without confirmation.

The seven Mobile Safari vulnerabilities -- which likely affect the desktop (Windows and Mac) versions of the browser -- range from disclosure of URL contents, dialing phone numbers with a confirmation dialog, cross-site scripting and the manipulation of the contents of documents served over HTTPS.

Michal Zalewski, the browser hacking guru recently hired by Google, is credited with reporting three of the Safari vulnerabilities.

In addition to the iPhone patches, Apple is expected to ship a monster Mac OS X update later today. This will include fixes for the year-old QuickTime code execution issue that made headlines recently.

Topics: Security, Apple, Telcos, Operating Systems, Networking, Mobility, iPhone, Collaboration, Browser, Wi-Fi

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25 comments
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  • I wonder if they patched anything else.... :)

    NT
    BitTwiddler
  • RE: Apple patches 10 iPhone security holes

    Many more to come, I'm sure.
    spamsucker@...
  • Apple did this on purpose

    This conspiracy theory I'm about to present is really no different than those Mac zealots who believe MS purposefully places bugs in XP to convince people to upgrade to Vista. Here goes:

    We now see the rationale behind the "Apple will brick unlocked iPhones". The timing is simply too close to be coincidental. First, release an incredibly insecure product with holes [b]everywhere[/b], including remotely executable vulnerabilities, YIKES!! Then tell people not to update their phones with these [b]CRITICAL[/b] security patches if they've unlocked the iPhone. People are now left with the knowledge that if they try to take $1 out of Apple's coffers (remember, Apple gets a huge kickback from AT&T for every phone registered), Apple will bite back and leave you with 2 choices:
    1. Use a phone that will get hacked.
    2. Throw your phone in the garbage and buy a new one. CHA-CHING!!! That's the sound of Apple profiting from the deliberate inclusion of security holes within the iPhone.

    Snicker, smirk :)
    NonZealot
    • Lay-off the crack son . <NT>

      <NT>
      Intellihence
      • He could be right

        First they say the I-Phone hack will cause problem updates and it voids you warranty. Then out comes 10 patches for vulnerabilities and what coincidence, the perfect way to disable those hacked I-Phones or the consumer could choose to be vulnerable.
        voska
        • vulnerable to what? any examples? NT

          NT
          Non-Zealand
          • Did you read Ryan's article?

            here... I'll paste it for you....

            [i]Bluetooth (CVE-2007-3753) ? An input validation issue in the iPhone?s Bluetooth server could allow the use of maliciously-crafted Service Discovery Protocol (SDP) packets to trigger an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution.

            Mail (CVE-2007-3754 and CVE-2007-3755) ? When Mail is configured to use SSL for incoming and outgoing connections, it does not warn the user when the identity of the mail server has changed or cannot be trusted. An attacker capable of intercepting the connection may be able to impersonate the user?s mail server and obtain the user?s email credentials or other sensitive information. Separately, following a telephone (?tel:?) link in Mail will dial a phone number without confirmation.

            The seven Mobile Safari vulnerabilities ? which likely affect the desktop (Windows and Mac) versions of the browser ? range from disclosure of URL contents, dialing phone numbers with a confirmation dialog, cross-site scripting and the manipulation of the contents of documents served over HTTPS.[/i]
            Badgered
    • I was thinking the exact same thing

      The timing here just seems too good to be true.
      voska
      • hahahahahahaha

        Basically your saying "Shame on Apple for making a product better" and defending the
        few who have chosen to do things with a product the manufacturer advices against...

        This is just complete and utter nonsense.
        Non-Zealand
      • re: timing

        I'd be more inclined to think that they had a bunch of updates to put out, and added something that would intentionally brick the iPhone after realizing that it had been hacked. That is of course, only [b][i]IF[/i][/b] the update bricks the iPhone.
        Badgered
    • Sorry to tell you....

      Sorry, your wrong. Plain and simple. :-(

      If you buy a ford mustang and change the engine, wheels, seats, etc, it is no longer a ford mustang. If you hack an iPhone or any other device it is now something different. Sorry.

      So, even if Apple made changes to fix the holes that would allow a hacker to change the phone, that just means that they are working to keep it a real iPhone.

      PS, when was the last time you complained so strongly about Microsoft products? Yea, just what I thought. :-)
      eldernorm
      • Your analogy is WWWAAAAAAYYYY off

        And you can ask anyone who restores cars for a living, or a nice hobby for shows.
        laura.b
    • You are right about the conspiracy

      You are so right... It's a consipiracy... Apple consipred with the rest of the world to expose the dumbest people around us.

      Only someone so dumb they could barely breathe would be dumb enough to hack a device, break their EULA, and then turn around, install a software update on top of their hack... and to boot.... these brain dead morons had the stupidity to stand up, raise their hands in the air, and exclaim to the world... Duh gee george... dahhhhh bachooey chomp, I tink it's brokedeeded...

      So if anyone out there is reading this who knows someone this dumb... do us all a favor and club them over the head and tatoo the word moron across their forehead.... And hopefully, no one will sell them anything pointy or dangerous or hard or heavy...for the rest of their short lives.
      i8thecat
  • lots of other apple updates...

    but I don't see apple trying to [b]sneak[/b] in any. ;-)

    http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/07/09/27/apple_updates_iwork_08_ipod_touch_itunes_pc_mac_firmware.html

    gnu/linux...giving choice to the neX(11)t generation.
    Arm A. Geddon
    • I didn't see where ....

      ... Microsoft bricked any PC or Mobile phones either! Which do you think is more aggregious?
      ShadeTree
      • Apple didn't brick any phones

        iPhone users bricked their phones after hacking them then applying the update without heeding the warnings.

        Get off the stupid we're all a victim of evil corporations rant. Marxism went out of fashion a decade ago.
        frgough
  • So how many unlocked iphones got bricked?

    Anyone know how many unlocked iphones got bricked? Bring on the class action lawsuits.
    kraterz
    • Lawsuits?

      That's just being silly. Why not join the battery lawsuits while you're at it?

      So far, the word is that 1.1.1 will re-lock and make your iPhone un-activateable, even with the original AT&T SIM!

      However, as with many updates, it has bricked even legitimate phones. I know of 2 so far.

      Just as with the previous software versions, it's back to the drawing board for the hackers. It may be two months before a solution is found. It may take longer. If Apple is encrypting the software, the work-arounds will take longer just to figure out, much less implement.
      Eriamjh
      • Get a clue doom caller

        "However, as with many updates, it has bricked even legitimate phones. I know of 2 so far."

        I have frieds that do apple support and barely any non hacked iphones were bricked... And apple is replacing those...

        Why is it that absolute morons thing they can hack the iPone, break the EULA, and then are STUPID, STUPID, STUPID enough to try to install an update on the hacked device... DUH!!!!!!

        These people need to get back on the short bus and go back to Special Ed class.


        Sure they have a lawsuit... ROTFLMAO!!!!
        i8thecat
  • RE: Apple patches 10 iPhone security holes

    "Anyone know how many unlocked iphones got
    bricked? Bring on the class action lawsuits."

    Apple warned users not to unlock or mess with their
    phone and said if they did did their warranty would be
    voided they did it anyway good luck making a case
    stick.
    Kobashrer