Black Hat RFID talk back on, with deletions

Black Hat RFID talk back on, with deletions

Summary: Chris Paget from IOActive is on stage here at Black Hat DC 2007, going ahead with his talk on RFID security issues. He has promised "not to mention a certain three-letter vendor" and made it clear that the talk had to be slightly modified to work around the legal issues.

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TOPICS: Security
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Chris Paget from IOActive is on stage here at Black Hat DC 2007, going ahead with his talk on RFID security issues. He has promised "not to mention a certain three-letter vendor" and made it clear that the talk had to be slightly modified to work around the legal issues.

It appears (see bottom pic) that a deal was reached with HID to remove certain slides and proceed with the discussion.

Chris Paget, IOActive

Paget's slide referencing HID request 

See more images from the conference in our Black Hat DC 2007 image gallery.

Topic: Security

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3 comments
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  • It is OK to infringe if it is complimentary.

    It appears that the criticism got fast peddled to a sales demo. HID is no different than the creators of Barney or Scientology suing on infringement grounds over criticism. At least with copyright it is called fair use. You cannot even build something patented and use it internally. You have to wait to let it fail in the marketplace. Security is another government mandated racket.
    osreinstall
  • RE: Black Hat RFID talk back on, with deletions

    Actually, in looking at http://www.patentclaim.com/IP_Resources/WOIapr2006.htm, it appears that IOActive may be guilty of "inducement". Jennifer actually acknowledges this as theoretically possible but based upon the above web link, it actually seems probable. IOActive backed off after consulting their attorney's for a reason.

    The relevent text from that web link states:

    "Indirect infringement takes two forms: contributory infringement or inducement to infringe. Patent law states that "whoever actively induces infringement of a patent shall be liable as an infringer" (35 U.S.C. ?? 271(b)). In other words, a company does not have to infringe a patent directly in order to be sued for patent infringement.

    Induced infringement is that which enables the direct infringer to practice the patented intention. This type of infringement can take the form of helping the direct infringer to assemble the patented product; providing instructions that detail how to produce the patented invention; preparing instructions for consumer use; or licensing plans or a process which enable the licensee to produce the patented product or process. The test for induced infringement is whether the inducer has demonstrated active aiding and abetting of the direct infringer's infringing activities."
    Mr. RFID
  • RE: Black Hat RFID talk back on, with deletions

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