Malware and spam attacks exploiting Picasa and ImageShack

Malware and spam attacks exploiting Picasa and ImageShack

Summary: In the wake of the recent malvertising attacks where malicious flash ads were appearing at trusted web sites, evidence from multiple vendors and researchers indicates that spammers and malware authors have once again switched tactics, and are one again abusing legitimate services such as Google's Picasa and ImageShack.

SHARE:
TOPICS: Security
0

In the wake of the recent malvertising attacks where malicious flash ads were appearing at trusted web sites, evidence fromMessageLabs Flash Spam multiple vendors and researchers indicates that spammers and malware authors have once again switched tactics, and are one again abusing legitimate services such as Google's Picasa and ImageShack. Whereas the technique is nothing new, and was in fact recently used in the malware campaigns targeting Facebook users, compared to previous campaigns aiming to impersonate trusted domains like ImageShack through typosquatting, this time the flash redirectors are hosted at legitimate services, with the bogus accounts apparently registered in an automated fashion.

Could a simple flash file redirector pushing fake security software actually trick a large number of users? Of course, especially when the files are hosted at legitimate services, the message localized to a native language, and the links spammed to millions of users.

According to the August 2008 MessageLabs Intelligence Report :

"Analysis highlights that Google Picasa Web Albums is the latest of Google's hosted services to be exploited by spammers while Adobe Flash redirection techniques are also being abused by spammers to host Flash-based .SWF, Shockwave Flash, files that cause Web browsers to re-direct to the spammer's site. Together, both of these new techniques accounted for less than 2 percent of spam in August, but MessageLabs expects these tactics will increasingly generate more spam in the coming months."

With malicious attackers looking for alternative ways to monetize the traffic that's coming to their rogue security software sites, as of recently they've also introduced client-side exploits within the sites, potentially infecting even those who didn't download the software itself. Theoretically, localizing the spam message by translating it into a native language increases the chances that more local users will click on it, and with Symantec reporting a localized message to German with over 300 million instances of it already detected, we have a decent example of a localized attack :

Symantec's comments on the ImageShack attack :

"The .swf attack with the largest volume observed is the German pharmacy attack, with over 300 million instances seen. The body of this message is in German and includes a list of medications that are offered for sale along with the price and assurances that the transaction will be discreet. To order a product, you are directed to click the link of the .swf file, which then redirects you towards an online ordering site. These sites, as well as the .swf links, seem to be rotating fairly often which is a common spammer technique."

With spammers, phishers and malware authors consolidating and working together, it is becoming increasingly common toFlash imageshack malware see phishing tactics applied in malware attacks, and malware tactics applied to spamming attacks, making today's harmless spam site tomorrow's exploits serving one. Moreover, from the attacker's perspective, abusing legitimate services not only adds an extra layer of social engineering juice, but also, increases the probability that the links would pass through anti-spam filters, so keep an eye on such attack attempts.

Topic: Security

Dancho Danchev

About Dancho Danchev

Dancho Danchev is an independent security consultant and cyber threats analyst, with extensive experience in open source intelligence gathering, malware and cybercrime incident response.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

0 comments
Log in or register to start the discussion