Less Web, more services?

Less Web, more services?

Summary: Are we through arguing about the composition of the asphalt in the road and ready to start talking about transportation?  Jorgen Thelin, program manager for distributed systems standards at Microsoft, recently posted this intriguing analysis of why we've crossed the threshold into what he calls the "Third Age of Web Services.

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TOPICS: Cloud
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Are we through arguing about the composition of the asphalt in the road and ready to start talking about transportation?  Jorgen Thelin, program manager for distributed systems standards at Microsoft, recently posted this intriguing analysis of why we've crossed the threshold into what he calls the "Third Age of Web Services."

The First Age of Web Services:  Basic Web Services: The focus was on creating the base communication and messaging layer - including SOAP, WSDL and UDDI specifications.

The Second Age of Web Services: A more advanced stage, in which the focus was creating the WS-* stack for Advanced Web Services - including WS-ReliableMessaging, WS-AtomicTransaction, WS-SecureConversation and WS-Policy specs among others.

Now, we enter the Third Age of Web Services, in which the focus is shifting to applying the Web services stack to specific applications and vertical domains.

Point taken: the business of Web services is no longer technology; the business of Web services is business.

Thelin points to an analogy provided by Burton Group's Jamie Lewis to illustrate how we're worrying less about the nitty-gritty details about standards and technologies, and more about how this fits into the business of business: "Arguments over the chemical composition of asphalt -- the protocols necessary to build the standard framework -- is of little value to customers who need a solution to a very real problem," according to Lewis. "What customers want is products and services that solve their identity problems -- the cars and trucks that actually help people get somewhere, but that work in an interoperable system -- cars that run on the public road."

While Lewis' analogy was orginally intended for identity management scenerios, Thelin correctly observes that this applies to Web services as a whole. We're ready for the next phase. 

 

Topic: Cloud

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  • Third age?

    More like Third Reich! The SOA Nazis keep telling us that SOA "EEST GUT for you" and "everyone VILL go DEES VAY". NO ONE with a stake in SERVER computing will embrace this technology! Not IBM, HP, Sun, OR M$. So who's left, and if they aren't big then why should a company go with them?

    The best analogy I can come up with is the US economy. China buys our government bonds and keeps its currency fixed - which means that China LOSES MONEY as the dollar falls. But this strategy keeps its prices down, so it can export record-high amounts of commerce to the US.

    Major corporations want to deal with large computer firms, because they want support today AND tomorrow. Large computer firms have a stake in consulting and server sales, which would be threatened by ubiquitous SOA - where anyone can switch vendors in an eye blink. So Major corporations will NOT get SOA.
    Roger Ramjet
  • So what's it all about, Roger?

    You raise an intriguing point, Mr. Ramjet (and yes, I know that's not your real name). But please follow it through.

    Is it your contention that IBM et al are merely giving lip service to SOA? (Do their own people in the SOA group(s) know that that?) And can they hold back a trend by merely standing against it? Detroit's Big 3 couldn't hold back Japan. Your contention that major companies won't embrace SOA is even more mysterious. When is the last time buyers resisted the commoditization of anything?

    Yes, big companies may want big vendors to buy from. But who is to say that today's big vendors (the ones who resist SOA instead of trying to figure out how to aggregate its benefits in a one-stop shop) will be tomorrow's?
    brittonmanasco@...