CyberPower introduces Atom-powered Windows Home Server 100

CyberPower introduces Atom-powered Windows Home Server 100

Summary: We already have both networking and storage companies flooding the market with network storage, but now it looks like boutique PC makers are getting into the act as well. CyberPower, best known for its gaming computers, has just announced a unit based on an Intel Atom processor and running Windows Home Server server.

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We already have both networking and storage companies flooding the market with network storage, but now it looks like boutique PC makers are getting into the act as well. CyberPower, best known for its gaming computers, has just announced a unit based on an Intel Atom processor and running Windows Home Server server.

The CyberPower Windows Home Server 100 comes in a nondescript mini-ITX case with 2GB of RAM and a single 500GB hard drive. It includes built-in high-definition audio processing and an S-Video port to connect to a video source or TV. No word on whether there are any USB ports to add external storage. On the CyberPower Web site, it appears you can change the storage amount (even downgrading to 320GB or upgrading to 1TB) and add a DVD burner.

The base price for the 500GB Windows Home Server 100 is $399, though you can move to 1TB for an additional $49. You can throw in a memory-card reader for another $10. That's far less than HP's Windows Home Server units, but they have a lot more panache and added functionality.

Topics: Storage, Hardware, Operating Systems, Software, Windows

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15 comments
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  • This is nothing new

    I've been selling the same thing since at least as far back as October. It's an Intel D945GCLF2 motherboard with an Atom 330 integrated (as in, soldered on) 1.60GHz dual-core + Hyperthreading CPU. It can run 2 threads per core, so Windows "sees" 4 CPU's in the system. It also supports x64.

    The motherboard has 1 DDR2 slot and supports a maximum of 2GB. It also has 2 SATA ports on it, and 1 IDE. The case is an In-Win BM639 Mini-ITX, and supports 1 3.5" hard drive, and 1 2.5" hard drive. It also supports 1 slimline optical drive + 3.5" external device, or a single "half-height" (normal-sized, "full-height" is 2 drive bays if you remember IBM AT's) optical drive. It includes 4 external USB ports, and the case has an additional 2 in the front, as well as audio out (they should be obvious from the picture). There is no eSATA out. It is a standard Mini-ITX SFF integrated desktop motherboard. It isn't custom designed, or anything special. It does Vista Aero, but isn't Vista Premium certified because of Microsoft's changes to the WHQL requirements. Since it's a 945 chipset, it includes a GMA 950, which is the lowest end Intel GMA that supports Aero.

    The HD audio and Svideo-out are useless for Windows Home Server.

    I've been selling this system with a standard DVD-RW drive and a 500GB hard drive with Windows Vista Home Premium x64 and 2GB of RAM ever since the motherboards started shipping in Canada.
    Joe_Raby
    • Nothing New but...

      ...not a bad price. I just added up the components needed to build it and came up with about $248 on new egg. A WHS OEM copy would run about $100 for $348 total. Might be a good candidate for Linux though juts to save the $100 - particularly if all it needs to do is provide access to its hard drive.
      cornpie
  • Yawn! Another crash happy file-loser

    Um... just what we all need... another windows box that stays on all day to drain the power grid....

    I've yet to see a windows box that doesn't hose itself just sitting there... and now we're to put another crash-happy hacker target on the home network... that's bound to update/reboot itself when we're trying to use it...
    ThePoke
    • Gee, let me guess

      either another Mac-supremacist or Linux fanboy... with a bit of tree hugger mixed in
      for good measure.

      1: These machines, when sitting idle, eat no
      more electricity than your typical DVR.

      2: I'd like to know where you come up with
      your little "crash happy" theory. Even their
      workstation OS's, since XP, are not crash
      happy, and their server derivations since 2003
      are nicely stable, unless you install crapware
      on them, but that's applicable to ANY O/S.

      3: Any idiot who sets up a network connected
      to the internet, without firewall or proxy
      server protection gets what they deserve
      gavin142
      • Um....

        "These machines, when sitting idle, eat no
        more electricity than your typical DVR."

        The CPU clocks in at 8W. It's a dual-core. Mobile Core 2 Duo's are a lot higher than that.

        Let me put it this way: the power supply in an In-Win BM series case is 120W maximum, and it supplies enough power for you to run a Core 2 Duo E8000 series CPU on it with the DG45ID or DQ45EK motherboard, 4GB of dual-channel DDR2-800 RAM, and a 1TB hard drive and Blu-ray/DVDRW combo drive running Windows Vista SP1 x64. I know - I build systems to those specifications.
        Joe_Raby
    • You have no idea what this product is or does...

      A little research will make you look a lot less stupid.
      BitTwiddler
    • try it first

      Microsoft has a 120 day trial version. They send you all 3 disks. Installed it on an old box I had, so have only added the drives. Runs a version of 2003 server. ( have 2 full 2003 severs running down stairs with no problem for 3 yrs) Have had no problems with WHS rebooting until I reached the 120 day limit and then it warns me to upgrade and reboots every 2 hrs. Better than stop working entirely. I have turned off auto update. Backs up 4 computers on my home network and is a media server that even plays thru my PS3. Will only backup XP and above. Have already bought the upgrade for $90 online. I wish that I had this backup system before my last computer crash. For that alone it is worth it. Don't form an opinion when you have not experienced WHS.
      scat14
  • RE: CyberPower introduces Atom-powered Windows Home Server 100

    I ordered a new cyberpower tower,and I have been waiting for ever to take delivery.
    Hammbone
  • Sum of the parts is about $260, without WMS

    And the Media Server license is a sticking point, since the street price for that is $140 all by itself, more expensive than any other component!

    Is there an Ubuntu alternative to Windows Home Server?
    terry flores
  • RE: CyberPower introduces Atom-powered Windows Home Server 100

    I am not impressed with Home Server. I bought an HP unit; it would not install; called HP support who walked me thru a problem the installer should have handled automatically (needed service not running). After that, on my first computer it took 2 days (42 hours) to do the first backup on 38 gig of disk. I realize subsequent ones would be faster.
    On the second computer, could not get backup to work at all. Error in event log was "object not set to instance of object" which indicates either amateur or sloppy coding. HP was contacted, they had me drop some trace files which I emailed to them and they NEVER answered the email. Fortunately I was able to return the unit for full refund.
    I now am (happily) using a big Seagate USB drive that cost 1/4 as much for twice the capacity.
    dale@...
    • HP Windows Home Server

      The issues you had sounds directly related to HP. I had a box doing nothing, AMD Athlon X2 4200+, SATA, DVD, Sound, 2Gig of memory and yes even a Video card. Added another 500Gig SATA drive and Windows Home Server OEM. Total cost $160 for a 1Ter system. None of my original backups took more than 1 hour. Thats for Vista x32, Vista x64 and WindowsXP Pro.

      Since the backup is an image backup, it allowed me to upgrade my wifes PC in less than an hour from IDE to SATA, without having to install a single application. Nice and by the way NO crashes.

      Les
      LesBater
  • Where is the toaster handle?

    The case design seems to beg for it
    mrdelurk@...
  • Close, but not quite

    These need a 4 bay removable hard drive cage plus a single internal SSD drive for OS to be perfect. This is after all a central server, so RAID 5 is a must. Having 4 removable SATA drives along with an internal SDD drive for the Windows Home Server installation would make this a perfect box. The mainboard with the atom chip is perfect though. That was a fantastic idea.
    Narg
    • Called "home" server for a reason

      RAID 5 would be overkill for a home user. In any case, RAID isn't even recommended for Windows Home Server. WHS uses Drive Extender and a file duplication technology that serves a similar purpose. I have generally found RAID to be more for performance, and RAID5 adds to that, availability. What really sours me to RAID is how inflexible it can be. A failed RAID card would generally require a identical replacement and all the drives need to be the same. Of course, YMMV
      xelan
  • RE: CyberPower introduces Atom-powered Windows Home Server 100

    Posted by Narg;

    "Close, but not quite
    These need a 4 bay removable hard drive cage plus a single internal SSD drive for OS to be perfect. This is after all a central server, so RAID 5 is a must. Having 4 removable SATA drives"

    Are you kidding, this is targeted to the home user, not some huge company that has a huge damand on network traffic and or redundency. Home users don't need RAID 5 and really to use a Mirror RAID 1 or 3 is just fine. Home users looking to use a Actual Domain Server is even more fetched, and most are only using servers for File storage and or home gaming servers. THere is no need to use a RAID 5. Thats outragous to mention that it isn't good enough for the home user. For real. How many Clients you think a home network needs. Odds say that it will not exceed more then 8 PC Clients, and especially not at one time. Most home users are going to have about 3 or 4 on at any one time, and a few that might be downloading regularly. Any typical home user will know that, prioritizing surtain ports will greatly enhance the network traffic and flow control. And if they don't know how to do that then, frankly they shouldn't be having a network of any type.
    Ez_Customs