User Experience, Rich Internet Applications and the future of software

User Experience, Rich Internet Applications and the future of software

Summary: When thinking about the role Rich Internet Applications play in the future of software, I always think about the blurring line between web apps and desktop apps. So if we break down the "good" traits from the "bad" ones, do we get a better picture of what the future should look like?

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TOPICS: Apps
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I had a great conversation tonight with a group of people including Mark Piller of Midnight Coders that helped me bring together my thoughts on how software should look down the road. One of the things I constantly wrestle with is where desktop apps fit into the RIA world and how Rich Internet Applications can enhance software. Let's first look at the things that are mostly good from both a user and developer standpoint:

  • A rich user experience
  • A central destination that applications automatically update from and developers can push out new versions
  • A workflow that allows designers and developers to easily create a compelling application
  • Access to data whether the client is connected to the web or not
  • Seamlessly integrated multimedia

Now things that are bad:

  • Being locked into one platform
  • Applications restricted by the browser model
  • Messy, intrusive installations
  • An installation required for every application we use

The underlying problem is that we associate the web with the browser. The browser is a terrible implementation for web applications, but there are specific traits that are so closely tied with the browser that it becomes hard to isolate them. For instance people love the fact that you can browse to a destination and have access to your application. We associate that with typing a URL into the browser and having a web application show up. But why does that have to be in a browser? Why couldn't we use the central destination model with an application on the desktop? Does that app even need to be installed? What if it's just an icon on the desktop that loads something from a central server? What if it's just a couple of files in the application directory?

At the same time when we're working with applications in the browser, they haven't been able to compete with the experience of desktop applications. The browser model is restrictive and it shows. Pushing Ajax to the limits just ends up showcasing how far we still need to go. The key is a rich, desktop like experience but with the flexibility of a browser-based application.

The current crop of RIA technologies are really evolutionary steps, and Erick Doleki has a nice post along these lines. Flex, Apollo, "WPF/E" and WPF are all moving in the direction of the perfect app - one that pulls centrally from the web but actually resides on the client. We're starting to see the convergence, which is one reason why these technologies are so exciting. At the same time, we are seeing a huge focus on the actual experience of the applications and how a great designer-developer workflow can make a big difference. That's a key point in reaching software nirvana. We can't just port web apps to the desktop or vice versa. We have to build a great experience around the next generation. That requires talent and tools, which is why innovation in that space is so important.

In the future, we really will have no distinction between "browser based apps" and "desktop apps" but that doesn't mean that one or the other will win. The mixture of both is what really makes the next generation of software compelling. The sooner we ditch the browser, the sooner we can make the leap. That's one of the things Rich Internet Applications enables.

Topic: Apps

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8 comments
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  • People say "evolution" like it's a bad thing

    Provided it doesn't cost $400.00 for the full version, evolutionary steps aren't necessarily a bad thing. The process of evolution preserves the competitive traits and loses functionality that doesn't contribute to productivity. I like evolution.

    And just how are centralized apps going to run on different platforms without some type of a middleware application that's either like a browser with more functionality or like a CLR that compiles on the fly and runs locally? Like JAVA. There has to be something, you're not going to streaming code across the net. So call it a "browser" or an "application environment" there has to be something in there that knows the host operating system and provides a common application environment.

    That's why the browser model has shown such surprising resiliency. It's a like a bare Christmas tree you can hang all kinds of neat plugin ornaments and decorate to your taste. And you can duplicate that environment across operating systems.
    Chad_z
    • Thanks! - you framed the issues very well - NT

      NT
      raycote
  • browser mark II

    What truely limits the internet most is the current crop of 'browsers' we're forced to use with it. They were originally intended for serving-up simple pages of texts, with links, and allowing people to author documents on-line. They were not designed as clients for rich applications, so we've spent years bolting-on new technolgies, plug-ins, and add-ons to try and get the broswers to cope.

    Its time to kill the dinosaurs and introduce the mammal.

    Why not use Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP) as the browser of the 'new web'. Its open-source, runs on serveal operating-systems, and provides developers with the services needed to be able to design rich internet applications that be used both on and off-line.
    sj_z
  • Great post!

    I enjoy reading your forward thinking post. A lot of what you describe in making software available on the desktop and the designer/developer workflow is where I think MS is focused (to bad it's just on windows). MS ClickOnce fits nicely with the features you described and some retailers like <a href="http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/archive/2007/02/01/great-wpf-applications-4-otto.aspx?CommentPosted=true#commentmessage">Otto</a> and The New York Times Reader are already taking advantage of it today.

    I here Adobe talk a lot about helping developers take there existing apps out of the browser, but if I really want the best rich reach, I would more than likely want to redo the app in Flex or WPF.
    MarlonSmith
  • Great post! (corrections)

    I enjoy reading your forward thinking post.

    A lot of what you describe in making software available on the desktop and the designer/developer workflow is where I think MS is focused (to bad it's just on windows). MS ClickOnce fits nicely with the features you described and some retailers like <a href="http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/archive/2007/02/01/great-wpf-applications-4-otto.aspx">Otto</a> and The New York Times Reader are already taking advantage of it today.

    I here Adobe talk a lot about helping developers take there existing apps out of the browser, but if I really want the best rich reach, I would more than likely want to redo the app in Flex or WPF.
    MarlonSmith
  • SAAS and RIA??

    can a SAAS product be delivered through WPF or Apollo onto the desktop??? Could you call such an app SAAS?
    mbakertob
  • RE: User Experience, Rich Internet Applications and the future of software

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  • RE: User Experience, Rich Internet Applications and the future of software

    I have really enjoyed your blog. I totally agree with your thoughts that in the future, we really will have no distinction between "browser based apps" and "desktop apps". I also agree there will still be a need for both. I think that with new languages such as HMTL5 and AJAX coders now have the tools to create feature rich applications that will far surpase web applications of the past. Feel free to visit my blog at: http://brendanread.wordpress.com/
    brendanread