Can virtualization help when times get tough?

Can virtualization help when times get tough?

Summary: When times get tough, many organizations look for new ways to reduce costs while still being able to provide their customers with the products and services they need. This appears to be just such a time.

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When times get tough, many organizations look for new ways to reduce costs while still being able to provide their customers with the products and services they need. This appears to be just such a time. Virtualization technology can most certainly be part of the solution. Let's review how each of the layers could be of assistance.

  • Access virtualization, such as that offered by Citrix and Microsoft, can make it possible for administrative and operational cost reductions while still making needed applications available in a secure, reliable way.
  • Application virtualization, such as that offered by Citrix, Microsoft and many others, can make it possible for applications to be made available to staff members in a reliable way and even make it easier to update these applications without having to visit each and every laptop or desktop computer.
  • Processing virtualization, such as that offered by Citrix, IBM, HP, Microsoft, Oracle, Sun, Virtual Iron and many others can either allow many machines to work together to get tasks done more quickly to optimize staff member's time or consolidate tasks onto a smaller number of physical machines. This approach can result in hardware, software, operational and adminisitrative cost reductions.
  • Network virtualization, such as that offered by Cisco, Juniper and others, can make it possible to reduce the costs of administrative and operating costs.
  • Storage virtualization, such as that offered by EMC, IBM, Hitachi, HP, NetApp, Sun and others, can do for storage what processing virtualization does for processing.
  • Management and security software for virtualized environments may be the area having the biggest opportunity for cost reduction.

This very quick run down of how virtualization technology only touches on the benefits that can be found.

How is your organization using this technology in these trying times? If this isn't part of the plan, it might be wise to talk to suppliers such as those mentioned above to learn how they can help in these trying times.

Topics: CXO, Cloud, Hardware, Storage, Virtualization

About

Daniel Kusnetzky, a reformed software engineer and product manager, founded Kusnetzky Group LLC in 2006. He's literally written the book on virtualization and often comments on cloud computing, mobility and systems software. In his spare time, he's also the managing partner of Lux Sonus LLC, an investment firm.

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2 comments
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  • In order to save money, you have to spend money.

    In hard times, the Chiefs are simply cutting IT budgets, full stop. Unfortunately, this simply proves what in IT we already know. Namely, that the managers are too stupid to understand the real value of investment.
    peter_erskine@...
    • Different job, different knowledge

      I've had many conversations with the CEOs of KG clients. In most cases, these are very smart people who have a bias towards taking action to move towards their and their company's goals. They don't have detailed knowledge of technology because they have little day-to-day need for that information.

      They, for the most part, understand the 80/20 rule that says that knowing the right 20 percent of the knowledge makes a person able to handle 80 percent of the circumstances they face. All they really need to do is either know where to find the remaining 80 percent of the information or know someone who had a good grasp on that 80 percent of the knowledge.

      This usually means that the CEOs know the benefits they receive from IT functions, but not how it is done.

      At this point, the CEOs often are facing financial conditions that, in their view, requires an overall reduction in spending. So, they're likely to say something like this to the Czar of IT in their organization:

      "I appreciate what you're doing for the organization and yet I must ask you to reduce your spending by <insert some ridiculous number here>. I don't want or need to know the technical details of what you're doing. Just do it. Oh, by the way, everything you're doing now must continue."

      IT isn't the only function getting this type of marching order. So is everyone else in the organization.

      Dan K
      dkusnetzky