Brazil will propose global Internet governance rules

Brazil will propose global Internet governance rules

Summary: The suggested bill of rights will be presented later this month

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Brazil is set to present a proposal for a global Internet Bill of Rights at a major conference on the subject later this month.

A board member of the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br) and Internet pioneer in Brazil, Demi Getschko, told newspaper O Estado de São Paulo that the proposal is based on a document previously created by the entity, which describes the principles for Web use and governance and was also used as a foundation for Brazil's Marco Civil da Internet.

Getschko added that the recently drafted suggestions for a global governance model are a "simplified version" of the original CGI.br document and will be presented at NETmundial, a global multistakeholder meeting on the future of Internet, which will take place on April 23 and 24.

A CGI.br spokesperson told ZDNet that the manifesto "will guide the discussions at NETmundial" and that the draft will undergo further validation by the event committee before its public release on April 14.

The proposal will effectively be a compilation of the most relevant suggestions from a total of 188 entries received by 46 different countries, according to the steering committee. The suggestions were sent by civil society representatives, private sector, academia and the global tech community, with observations on the two topics that will be addressed, "Principles of Internet Governance" and "A Script for the Future Development of the Internet Governance Ecosystem."

The creation of global standards for Internet governance is supported by many influencers around the world, including World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, who stated: "by passing the Marco Civil, Brazil will cement its proud reputation as a world leader on democracy and social progress and will help to usher in a new era – one where citizens’ rights in every country around the world are protected by digital bills of rights." 

Yesterday (3) Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff said on Twitter highlighted the support of the Web creator and added that she considers the Marco Civil "a tool of freedom of expression, individual privacy and respect for human rights."

After years of wrangling, the Marco Civil was approved by the Congress’ lower house last week and now needs to be approved by the Senate. Campaigners and politicians that support the creation of the Internet framework are lobbying for the Bill to be voted before NETMundial takes place.

Updated 18:10 EDT to add proposal details, release date.

Topics: IT Security in the Snowden Era, Government, Mobility, Privacy

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9 comments
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  • It's clear that Tim Berners-Lee doesn't know anything about Brazil or Dilma

    Tim Beanners-Lee: there is now a thing called world wide web where anyone could get information about pretty much anything. If you use this wonderful invention you will learn that Dilma loves democracy as much as her friends in Iran, Cuba, Venezuela people who, I am sure support, this stupid idea of giving the control of the internet to crazy and corrupt politicians and dictators.
    Marcvs Vinicivs
    • Not my country, but...

      ...if there have been the sorts of coercive machine tactics practiced in Brazil as there have been in Venezuela, Ecuador, and Bolivia; they haven't been reported in the US media. It wouldn't surprise me if the Chavez machine has a lot of friends on the Brazilian left (Chavez even had quite a few here in the USA before he became too obviously authoritarian), but I think it much more likely that President Rousseff is doing the usual political balancing act (trying to avoid offending either her leftist or her centrist supporters; or giving her opponents a cause to rally behind), than it is that she's a real Chavezista.
      John L. Ries
    • HAVE YOU BEEN IN BRAZIL BEFORE?

      BECAUSE I LIVE HERE IN BRAZIL AND ALSO I USED TO LIVE IN THE US. AND WE HAVE MORE FREEDOM HERE THEN ANYWHERE ELSE.AND ALSO ALL COUNTRIES AROUND US TREAT US AS BROTHERS.PEOPLE THAT KNOW OUR CULTURE LOVE US AND DEMOCRACY.
      BrazilMan2014gv
      • Ideological democracy?

        Yes, a such democratic country that it grants asylum to well known and multi-convicted terrorists, such as the Italian terrorist Cesare Battisti, for ideological and political reasons.
        SHAME on you Brazil.
        56tgp487
  • Here comes the treaty

    The devil will be in the details, of course.
    John L. Ries
    • Reply to Here comes the treaty

      Well, you can hope (and if you pray, pray) that good sense will prevail.
      Time Agora
  • The Brazilian Registrar (.br)

    On April 2, 2010 Brazil was held in breach of their registrar accreditation by ICANN for not supporting required WhoIs functionality. Here is the formal notification from that time.

    RE: NOTICE OF BREACH OF REGISTRAR ACCREDITATION AGREEMENT
    http://www.icann.org/en/news/correspondence/burnette-to-malinardi-02apr10-en.pdf

    After the 2010 notification, conditions improved a little, if you were careful and did WhoIs queries slowly. Then things started to deteriorate again. As of last week, Port 43 WhoIs requests only return the name of the registrant, if you are lucky and the web WhoIs interface only works from selected IP Addresses. But don’t take my word for it, please run you own tests and if you are successful please report the IP Addresses which work here.

    This year Brasil has a little problem with paying its bills:

    RE: NOTICE OF BREACH OF REGISTRAR ACCREDITATION AGREEMENT
    http://www.icann.org/en/news/correspondence/serad-to-araujo-07feb14-en.pdf

    Yes, the Internet will be in the very best of hands! It is time to replace the existing centralized DNS structure with a secure Pear-to-Pear DNS solution.
    http://p2pfoundation.net/Dot-P2P
    Michael Ronayne
    • You're grossly misinformed, that's not what those documents say

      Both documents are addressed to private corporations with no relation to the Brazilian government or the national steering committee. The first document is addressed to the Internet Group, or iG, which is well known in Brazil as a large commercial ISP and portal (have a look www.ig.com.br). The second one is addressed to Telefonica, a.k.a. Vivo, a subsidiary of the Telefonica group from Spain and the country's largest telco. It leads the market for telephone landlines in São Paulo state (the country's wealthiest and most populated), operates Brazil's largest cell phone carrier nationwide, and provides broadband and now cable TV services as well.

      Personally, I've never had problems accessing Registro.br's WHOIS, but I'm in Brazil and can't say how it goes for access from abroad.
      goyta
      • How much r u getting to defend the brazilian government?

        ???
        Edwander