Cumbrian village gets power-line broadband pilot

Cumbrian village gets power-line broadband pilot

Summary: The pilot scheme, run by the US firm Gridline, along with UK power and communications firms, is also aimed at seeing whether power-line broadband can be used for rural smart metering

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Gridline has begun a pilot project in the Cumbrian community of Shap, testing out the use of power-line broadband for consumer and smart-meter services.

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The US company announced the trial on Monday, saying it is working alongside Electricity Northwest, Cable and Wireless and T-Systems UK. Gridline said it expected the pilot to be fully up and running by the end of the month.

Power-line broadband involves using electricity lines to transmit broadband signals. The method is generally used within blocks of flats, but Gridline's Broadband over Power Lines (BPL) implementation is intended for longer distances.

"Once completed and validated, the partnership expects to move to a full deployment model addressing approximately 2.5 million meters/structures throughout the Electricity Northwest power grid," Gridline said.

The scheme is one of several being trialled to see how to address the issue of high-speed rural broadband. The village of Shap — notable for a nearby farmhouse where part of the film Withnail & I was shot — is a suitable testbed for such services, as it is in one of the pilot regions for the government's rural broadband drive.

The pilot will also be used to see whether power-line broadband can be used for the communications needs of smart meters. There are several trials going on at the moment, mostly using radio communications, to see how best to hook up the meters and help utility companies better monitor and control their networks.


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Topics: Broadband, Networking

David Meyer

About David Meyer

David Meyer is a freelance technology journalist. He fell into journalism when he realised his musical career wouldn't pay the bills. David's main focus is on communications, as well as internet technologies, regulation and mobile devices.

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  • Sending Signals through Powerlines is Good because WIRELESS IS BAD!

    WIRELESS SMART METERS LINKED TO CANCER.
    Utility Companies based their previous claims of safety on the World Health Organization (WHO),

    But June 1 2011, WHO says Wireless Smart Meter radiation is linked to CANCER (possible human carcinogen), and that means it also damages bodies and brains (including children’s) in many ways, other than cancer.

    Look for Utility Companies to further LIE and SPIN as they will call anything safe if they can get more of our money.

    Final insult: And then they advertise that it benefits us!

    1. WIRELESS SMART METERS – 100 TIMES MORE RADIATION THAN CELL PHONES.
    Video Interview: Nuclear Scientist, Daniel Hirsch, (5 minutes: 38 seconds).
    http://stopsmartmeters.org/2011/04/20/daniel-hirsch-on-ccsts-fuzzy-math/

    2. WIRELESS SMART METERS – CANCER, NERVOUS SYSTEM DAMAGE, ADVERSE REPRODUCTION AFFECTS.
    Video Interview: Dr. Carpenter, New York Public Health Department, Dean of Public Health, (2 minutes: 23 seconds).
    http://emfsafetynetwork.org/?p=3946

    3. THE KAROLINSKA INSTITUTE IN STOCKHOLM (the University that gives the Nobel Prizes) ISSUES GLOBAL HEALTH WARNING AGAINST WIRELESS SMART METERS.
    2-page Press Release:
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/48148346/Karolinska-Institute-Press-Release
    Robert Williams 22