Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

Moderated by Jason Hiner | December 12, 2011 -- 07:00 GMT (23:00 PST)

Summary: Microsoft and Nokia could be a potent combination. But can they dent iOS and Android domination?

Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller

Yes, huge growth ahead

or

Short term, probably not

Lawrence Dignan

Lawrence Dignan

Best Argument: Short term, probably not

The moderator has delivered a final verdict.

Opening Statements

Huge growth in 2012

Matthew Miller: It has now been just over a year since Windows Phone 7 was launched and we still see Microsoft's smartphone market share down in the 2% range. Nokia took a major risk earlier this year when they announced that their future smartphones would run Windows Phone. Given the overwhelmingly positive reviews from nearly all those covering the mobile space and the reported success of Nokia Lumia 800 sales outside the U.S., I think Windows Phone 7 will see huge growth in 2012 and Nokia is going to help them get into the 3rd place position behind Android and iOS.

WP 7 is a refreshing, fast, and stable smartphone operating system and whenever I show it to people they are impressed. Unfortunately, Microsoft doesn't seem to be able to generate much excitement after a year in the market. Back in the day, it seemed everyone had a Nokia phone and the company is going to have to make major efforts to get back to that level of recognition and with Windows Phone Microsoft is going to help them do that.
 

Short-term answer is probably not

Lawrence Dignan:   The question at hand is probably one of the largest ones in technology for 2012. Can Nokia and its band of Windows Phone devices become legit players in the U.S? Long term answer is perhaps. Short-term answer is probably not. When it comes to Windows Phone and Nokia, I hear a common refrain: "The devices look cool, the OS is nice, but..." That "but" typically means someone is buying an Android or iPhone.

Nokia's biggest problem is that it abandoned the U.S. years ago. It used to be a player. Then focused on the rest of the world. Maybe Nokia got cocky. Maybe Nokia just misfired. In either case, today it's going to be really tough for Nokia to get shelf space. The T-Mobile deal is a start, but little more.

The equation for Windows Phone may be different. I could see Windows Phone doing OK without Nokia. HTC, Samsung and others will roll with Microsoft. Nokia needs to break into the U.S. and differentiate.

Talkback

254 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

    Nokia chose to abandon the US market, I cant accurately say what the US Nokia fans will say. I cant even say that Nokia has any fans left in the US, outside of Nokias world HQ in Redmond WA.<br><br>The real test will come when Nokia starts selling theses phones in the US. Will those that railed against the iPhone for not having a removable battery complain? What is the price going to be? If they charge $300 for a 16 GB phone (based on prices listed elsewhere), will it be deemed too expensive? Too many questions, too few answers.
    Rick_Kl
    Reply Vote I'm Undecided
    • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

      @Rick_Kl

      I think I and probably quite a few others still have some goodwill for Nokia. All my best feature phones over the years were Nokias. But I just don't associate them with smartphones at all so I'm not sure how far that goodwill really gets them.

      Even if WP7 does well in the rest of the world via Nokia (anecdotal evidence coming in seems to indicate its a possibility) I suspect the US will be a challenge.
      SlithyTove
      Reply Vote I'm Undecided
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @SlithyTove I personally do not like it, but for others it might make sense. If you have bought 100% into a Microsoft lifestyle, it would not make sense to own an Android, or iPhone. Since I choose things that [b]suit my needs[/b] rather than blindly run out and just buy what others have. I understand that there is no one device that suits everyone. But I am a firm belier in not giving up everything to any single company.
        Rick_Kl
        Reply Vote I'm Undecided
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @SlithyTove
        The US buys what the marketers tell them to, so it all depends on their marketing.
        kstap
        Reply Vote I'm Undecided
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @kris_stapley@... The old stand by talking point, it's all about marketing. Sorry to burst your bubble but marketing only gets you so far then the devices have to stand on their own.
        non-biased
        Reply Vote I'm Undecided
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @Rick_Kl, I think most people do what you do. They haven't bought 100% in Apple, Google or Microsoft. They did not give up everything to any single company. And why whould they? Most services from these companies are available in the cloud. So most people mix and match services with or without native support on iOS, Android and Windows Phone.
        Forrestall
        Reply Vote I'm for Yes, huge growth ahead
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @kris_stapley If it were simply marketing, there would not be the repeat customers, nor would the product rank so high in the customer satisfaction ratings. I would also be very aware that the ???it is just marketing??? line can be turned around on every Microsoft product.
        Rick_Kl
        Reply Vote I'm Undecided
    • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

      @Rick_Kl <br><br>The US market needs something more...Apple is a niche and a lot of people don't like their crap including me. Android is another one of those players that I personally do not trust or like. Trust is an issue because Google is all about advertising dollars and they'd probably sell their workforce to a sweat shop if it meant an increase in profits. MS has the Corporate sector and a big shot at integrating home, work and play they just need to execute and spend big advertisement dollars to do so. If I'm MS...I go straight at Apple with a bunch of commercials to cut them down just like they did to MS over Windows!
      Rob.sharp
      Reply Vote I'm for Yes, huge growth ahead
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @rob.sharp@...
        "I'm a Windows Phone ... and I'm an iPhone." LOL ... That would be pretty dang funny and it would probably work extremely well. You could have the iPhone disconnecting people for being "held wrong" and all kinds of fun stuff.

        I think you have to look at how many rungs of the ladder can really be supported in a down economy. 2 or 3, at most. Blackberry is struggling, webOS has who-knows-what kind of future, and Microsoft has a chance to be a solid #3 player. They should press that advantage now. Don't worry about being #1 - get your feet firmly planted in the market now and move up when the next Google or Apple failure hits shelves.
        zaq.hack
        Reply Vote I'm for Yes, huge growth ahead
      • RE: Great Debate: Can Windows Phone 7 and Nokia become players in the U.S.?

        @rob.sharp@... I totally agree! This is Microsoft's turn. Google I really dont trust, they are soooo open sourced with android, and so many android devices, you know some of those droid devices WILL NOT get updates cause there are so many, and Apple really your just paying for the name. Microsoft does need to work on their marketing strategy. If they marketed the Zune HD Im sure it would of been super popular among xboxer's. Luckily they have Nokia on the team, have you seen what they have done with the Lumia? Im excited to see what they have to bring to the US market.
        Ryanthelyon
        Reply Vote I'm for Yes, huge growth ahead