Election result boosted Kiama NBN opt-in

Election result boosted Kiama NBN opt-in

Summary: NBN Co received a 9 per cent surge in homeowners opting to have their homes connected to the National Broadband Network (NBN) in the first mainland roll-out site of Kiama following the 2010 Federal Election.

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NBN Co received a 9 per cent surge in homeowners opting to have their homes connected to the National Broadband Network (NBN) in the first mainland roll-out site of Kiama following the 2010 Federal Election.

NBN Co's local construction manager Lance Parkes told ZDNet Australia during a tour of the site last month that many residents were reluctant to opt into the NBN while the outcome of the election was unknown, but said that after the Labor Party formed a minority government, the orders came flooding in. According to Parkes, 66 per cent of residents had opted in prior to the election but this was boosted to 75 per cent afterwards.

NBN Co CEO Mike Quigley had announced an extension to the deadline for residents to opt in after the election because of those who had held back to wait out the uncertainty.

As of December 2010, 1764 homes out of a total of 2343 at the site had signed up to have the fibre connected to their homes.

Parkes said that residents had generally been welcoming of the construction in the area, despite Kiama being a "blue ribbon" Liberal seat.

Kiama resides in the Gilmore electorate, held by Liberal member Joanna Gash since 1996. Gash used the last day of parliament last year to take a constituent's complaint to the Prime Minister that their nature strip had been destroyed by NBN Co workers laying fibre in the area.

Parkes said cases like that were rare, and that NBN Co had been working hard to return nature strips and driveways to their previous condition after the fibre had been laid.

NBN Co has inducted 372 people to work on the site, with 100 to 150 working at peak construction time. The company has used 16 drilling machines in the course of the construction and work on the site is expected to be completed in March.

Topics: Broadband, Government, Government AU, NBN

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Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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17 comments
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  • 9% is a SURGE! - wow sounds more like a trickle to me.
    advocate-d95d7
  • If only Richard Alston was here to write them all off as porno addicts - because thats all that people who use the internet are....

    oh how i don't miss those days....
    dougrathbone
  • sour grapes, advocate

    the whole opt-out debate is ridiculous anyway .. it's win-win
    redrover-fac06
  • Yes indeed that "9% trickle" has brought the take-up rate to over 75%, which advocate, neglected to mention...

    Funny thing is, even if it were 99% take-up, advocate would still be here claiming some strange, backward moral victory, because of that defiant 1%...LOL!
    RS-ef540
  • Its funny how digging up the nature strip is used against the NBN when the same opponents use the ol Telstra line that competitors should build their own networks - which would mean each competitor having to dig up the nature strip individually.
    xBeanie
  • I believe 2011 should be the year scrutiny is applied to NBN Co to deliver the NBN rollout. I cannot understand why we need these trial rollouts in selected locations. Afterall, there is not a lot new to learn. The industry has been pulling fibre cables for years, the technology used is not leading edge, so my view is NBN Co should get on with the roll out schedules and get going at full steam ahead. Yes even Nuclear propulsion is just a steam engine, and fibre optic's has been around for 40 years plus.
    Blank Look
  • Nice twist and dodge on the terminology RS, but you are full of those, it's not 'takeup rate' it's 'connection rate', you know the FREE bit of the deal "hey it's free why not'.

    The take up rate is those residences that then go on and sign up for NBN ISP plan from the two ISP's that are selling it.

    ... and the NBN ISP active plan take rate is? - err don't go there, stay with the FREE connection rate percentages, it sounds better - 'it's free'.
    advocate-d95d7
  • It's all part of the spin machine Visionary, you and I know that companies like Telstra Velocity have putting FTTH into large housing estates for years, but the NBN need to pilot into small areas within selected suburbs, then any set backs can be explained away with "it's a pilot there is bound to be teething problems" Conroy has already used that line - perhaps they need to ask the Telstra Velocity contractors who have been doing it for years and years how its done. :)
    advocate-d95d7
  • That's what you say today, but tomorrow you will be saying the opposite...

    So why do you even bother...?
    RS-ef540
  • I agree Visionary, scrutiny is always required when it comes to politicians.

    But let's be realistic in our scrutiny, because as has been mentioned by many others, we got SFA for 10 years from Minchin, Coonan and Co, so to expect Conroy/NBNCo to jump through hoops while we sat back and let the others do nothing but sip cristal... is very hypocritical.
    RS-ef540
  • the dubious business case for the nbn rollout assumed a 70 percent takeup, not just connection. i would think the concern here is that in an area with poor internet service, only 75 percent have decided to allow their homes to be hooked up, if 90 percent of these connect and pay a provider, we still wont meet the 70 % assumption used by quigly and his mates to justify the expenditure.
    airtime-91356
  • the dubious business case for the nbn rollout assumed a 70 percent takeup, not just connection. i would think the concern here is that in an area with poor internet service, only 75 percent have decided to allow their homes to be hooked up, if 90 percent of these connect and pay a provider, we still wont meet the 70 % assumption used by quigly and his mates to justify the expenditure.
    airtime-91356
  • I think you people who are more concerned by $ than anything else, need to understand this project is a national infrastructure project, which as such, really "doesn't need to justify" anything.

    But like all politicians we do at least, need to keep the bas****s honest.

    The opposition (bereft of any positive alternatives) are having to, and are, successfully promoting a scare/mudslinging campaign of FUD. Sadly, people such as your self who are being force fed their BS are gladly swallowing it...imo!
    RS-ef540
  • Not quite. Whilst I agree the Libs did stuff all in relation to comms, that doesn't mean that they should give the current government a pass when it comes to spending billions of our dollars. No matter which side of the fence is in government, I expect the opposition to scrutinise any project this large.
    mwil19-a34f7
  • Indeed I agree mwil19, the opposition should "scrutinise 24/7..."!

    Scrutiny... not invasiveness, interposition and interference.

    Which is sadly, all this opposition (who if they actually had a meaningful alternative, would make them more credible) are currently practicing, imo!
    RS-ef540
  • I agree in part. There are issues and concerns with this but Malcolm Turnbull is starting to become the boy who cried wolf. The Alcatel bribery scandal is case in point. He should leave issues like that alone and conserve his political ammo for the real issues.
    mwil19-a34f7
  • so in Kiama, nearly 400 people 6 months incl prep and associated effort - and all that gear to do say 1,700 houses. thats 200 man years of effort. thats near $20m in any money.
    That is 0.25 man year effor per 'connectable' but not active NBN household.
    On that trial it would take 3.5 million man years of effort to do 14 million connections.
    3.5 million man years / 10 years = 350,000 people per year required for the NBN.
    Each year for 10 years. The 'tria'l completely fails any economic cost to benefit case.
    So fair enough its trial, so on best case scale out lets say it eventually got to 10% of the man effort. That is 35,000 people each year, every year (NBN estimate was close to this not including external party effort and preparation - eg householder or business costs and effort). So that is a reasonable estimate.
    Then factor in far lower takeup rates in actual usage, say 30% best case.
    Thats 350,000 man years (35k x 10 years) = for a net result of 4m active NBN users.
    That is close to the NBN estimates of 36b in labour outlays and 3k per connection (NBN stats) but if active use is only 30% then it is actually 9k per active takeup user.
    The trend is to up to 50% of household/business being wireless ONLY long term and then at least 20% non participation, so 30% active takeup if not forced is reasonable.
    +
    So re the NBN being rated worlds worst practice, we are not just 24 x cost effort of others in providing a connection - but in the actual 'active used' connection, we are nearly 72 x times the global standard expected $ cost deployment to active biilable cost recovery use. $9k an active user connection best case.
    Its clearly uneconomic unless totally forced and all other alternatiives removed.
    That wont happen, and would be political suicide.- it all goes to show just how wrong Conroy and esp Quigley have misjudged this.
    You would do this in a massive depression, and to something else more critical.
    Not in comms when there are more economic and desirable alternatives in place and a rapidly changing technology environment that allows re-use or other options.
    Conroy and Quigley need to be replaced and the entire NBN ~ resolutioned ~ if Labor has any hope to salvage this NBN and their political survival.
    NBN failure from the gun