Emerging mobile tech to watch out for

Emerging mobile tech to watch out for

Summary: The Mobile World Congress isn't just about an infinite number of similar handsets, operators trying to get anyone interested in mobile TV, and platform wars. Lots of companies have something a little bit different on offer

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TOPICS: Mobility
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  • The Mobile World Congress isn't just about an infinite number of similar handsets, operators trying to get anyone interested in mobile TV, and platform wars. Lots of companies have something just that little bit different on offer.

    CSR — aka Cambridge Silicon Radio — shows off its eGPS technology.

    This uses extremely accurate timing information extracted from mobile-phone network base stations to increase the accuracy and speed of GPS locations derived from satellite signals. At the show, they were getting around 10-nanosecond accuracy, or 10 billionths of a second.

    eGPS doesn't need any specialist hardware beyond the ordinary GPS and GSM/3G radios; it takes between 20 and 100 MIPS of processor power, depending on what it's doing.

  • One of the best bits of the Mobile World Congress is finding small companies doing smart things. Funambol writes open-source software that provides push email, data synchronisation, software deployment and so on — and because it's open source, its user community is constantly adding new phones to its supported roster.

    Right now, the company claims that it supports half the phones in the world, and that companies like CA and HP are using the software for enterprise deployment. Its latest idea is ad-supported push email, where a one-line advert appears in your email list: Funambol says this could make push email services free for consumers and profitable for operators.

Topic: Mobility

Rupert Goodwins

About Rupert Goodwins

Rupert started off as a nerdy lad expecting to be an electronics engineer, but having tried it for a while discovered that journalism was more fun. He ended up on PC Magazine in the early '90s, before that evolved into ZDNet UK - and Rupert evolved with them into an online journalist.

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