Georgia Tech scientists connect more quantum networking dots

Georgia Tech scientists connect more quantum networking dots

Summary: There is a fair (read: large) amount of engineering work still to be done before this comes to a RealWorldTM near you, but scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have taken three big strides towards working quantum networks with discoveries that will enable quantum bits to be transmitted and detected over normal telecoms networks.The problem is that the ideal wavelength for quantum storage is much shorter than that for efficient information transmission.

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TOPICS: Graphene
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There is a fair (read: large) amount of engineering work still to be done before this comes to a RealWorldTM near you, but scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have taken three big strides towards working quantum networks with discoveries that will enable quantum bits to be transmitted and detected over normal telecoms networks.

The problem is that the ideal wavelength for quantum storage is much shorter than that for efficient information transmission. By sending the quantum signal through a specially shaped cloud of rubidium atoms the team can convert infrared photons that hold quantum data into much longer wavelength creatures that will move more contentedly through conventional optical networks.

They’ve also developed a quantum repeater that is within a gnat’s hair (well, a factor of ten) of being useable for avoiding signal loss along the way, and they’ve found a way of converting the signals back to infra-red wavelengths so that information can be detected by a quantum information system at the other end.

"This is [a] significant step toward improving quantum information systems based on neutral atoms," Associate Professor Alex Kuzmich says in the press release. "For quantum repeaters, most of the basic steps have now been made, but achieving the final benchmarks required for an operating system will require intensive optical engineering efforts."

The work is published here in Nature Physics. You can read much more, though, in the press announcement here.

Topic: Graphene

Lucy Sherriff

About Lucy Sherriff

Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are.

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  • Georgia Tech, not Georgian (that would refer to the country, Georgia, south of Russia, not the state in the USA)
    quacainia
  • Yes, quite. I do apologise for the brain fade. I've corrected the piece.

    Any thoughts on the the research? The pictures that accompanied the release showed some fairly heavy duty looking kit - not likely to be attached to a laptop any time soon, I'd have thought. What do you think? Real world impact anytime soon?
    Lucy Sherriff
  • Hi Lucy, sorry to go off-topic, I'm an author of thrillers (www.greigbeck.com) and make mention of Life-From-Space in my latest novel. At the end of my books, I like to explain some of the science behind my research and have found a terrific article by you on The Register webpage, that provides a great description. I'd love to use this information, and will give full reference to you, but how do i formally go about this to obtain this authorisation?

    All the best and regards, Greig
    GreigBeck