Google Glass becomes available to everyone, promptly sells out

Google Glass becomes available to everyone, promptly sells out

Summary: Now everyone (with $1,500 to burn) can be a "Glasshole."

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Google has opened the floodgates to the consumer market, announcing that Glass is available for purchase to just about everyone now.

This is much more than the one-day flash sale earlier this month in which the Android maker opened up the Google Glass Explorer Program to anyone who applied in time to grab a limited number of units.

Prior to April 15, the digital red ropes to the Explorer Program had been more tightly guarded, with invites only circulating to developers, members of the media, and a mixed gaggle of other recipients invited by other members or promotions on Twitter.

Earlier this week, Google launched a contest in honor of Earth Day that should drum up some new use cases for Glass -- notably in the nonprofit sector.

Highlighting the deployment of Glass and Glassware apps from the Arctic to the Amazon by the World Wildlife Fund as just one example, Google plans to award five U.S.-based nonprofits each with a Glass unit, a trip to a Google office for training, a $25,000 grant, and additional support from Google developers.

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The Internet giant highlighted how Glass is already being deployed by the World Wildlife Fund for monitoring and collecting data about rhinos.

Glass also made a huge step forward in preparing for a mass market launch with added support for the Apple iPhone as well as a booster shot for the companion Android app.

While general consumers are eligible to purchase a digital headset, it should be noted that the Explorer Version still hints at a beta-esque quality, meaning the product is still very much in development.

For interested buyers, an Explorer Version of Glass will still cost $1,500. At publishing time, units in all five shades were already sold out, and it is not clear when more will become available.

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Screenshot via Google Glass

Topics: Mobility, Apps, E-Commerce, Google, Hardware

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18 comments
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  • ZDNet and 'Glasshole'

    Has ZDNet ever written an article or published anything to do with Google Glass without using the term "Glasshole"? It was funny for about 5 seconds 2 years ago. Can we move on?
    alsw
    • zdnet is owned by m$

      so they will use their marketing and FUD terminology.

      couple of days ago, one of them pronounced that google glass was dead.
      GrabBoyd
      • Actually, the site runs on Linux

        which just proves without a doubt that this is a G$$gle owned site, plain and simple, no argument.
        William.Farrel
      • Take what alsw said, put a zero behind the two and you have...

        ...the same comment about m$
        ye
    • Agree

      I think glass is a really neat project. And with developer backing could become quite a revolutionary product. I get where the glasshole term came from. But I am come on people. There is always someone who abuses a product. Do we have cellholes ,pcholes, iholes, etc.. ?
      MLHACK
      • ... let's not forget the OTHER possibilities.

        MSholes
        LinexHoles
        GovHoles
        MayoeHoles
        ZD-NETholes
        .
        As far as I'm concerned, Goo'Glass should have been marketed as inconspicuous as possible, it could have been better accepted by the IdiotHoles, JerkHoles and MoronHoles.
        .
        fm.usa
    • Agree

      Whoever is calling the shots for these Glass articles has very strong opinions that are flooding into what are supposed to be news articles. It's appearing like either the writers or editors or somebody is an anti-Google fanboy, which makes me trust zdnet less and less to be a reliable source of news. I've even caught myself recently reading a zdnet article that had NOTHING to do with Google Glass, and thinking to myself "well, I can probably assume that the opposite of what they reported is actually true... after all, it's zdnet".
      AnomalyTea
  • Available to everyone

    Not sure it counts as available to everyone if no one can buy one, no price is quoted on the page where you sign up, and it's exclusive to the US.

    To me, this product most definitely has not yet launched.
    Sacr
  • promptly sells out !!!

    Lol...
    Owl:Net
    • sold out...

      The sold both pair that they had available.
      gribittmep
  • It might be

    an interesting product, but there is no way I will spend $1500 on anything like this. When the price comes down to $20 then maybe I will look into buying one. There are too many other more useful to me items that I could spend the money on.
    dhays
    • actually they should give it away free

      because they could pump ads right in the face of "glasshole" 24x7x365 and 100 times of 1500 on each glasshole.
      Ram U
  • Google Glass is for abject losers

    I've tried them. Completely unremarkable and the display sucks. Totally NOT ready for prime time. Even if there is ever a market for these, Google will not be the one to make a useable version. (But Apple could/will.) I would say Google Glass, regardless of selling out (all 6 remaining heh) is already a resounding failure.
    PaulG53
    • I wouldn't go that far

      As to say "losers" but I was extremely disappointed in Glass. There is a reason there are only a dozen or so Glass apps in total. It just isn't good enough in this version. Hopefully the next version will fix a lot of issues because we want to deploy them in our organization.
      m0o0o0o0o
  • Why?

    $1500 is alot. It's for the 'gotta' have it' crowd (any new gadget tech)--those with plenty of of disposable money--in some who just think they do. You could buy a top of the line phone 'and' cover the 2-year contract for just slightly more than $1500. For $1500 I could buy the best tablet computer that money can buy or a very nice laptop. I just don't think it's necessary technology; but I'm biased because I don't trust Google regarding their serious historical record of privacy infractions. I don't trust their motives therefore, I want nothing to do with them---I'll just steer clear, thanks. P.s. Some healthful advice, don't ever divide your attention if you choose to drive a car with one on.
    fun see tional
  • Internet

    How will you recieve the internet with this thing? You still have to pay for internet on top of the $1500. And the preocessor will be awwwfully weak. A phone is superior in every way.
    fun see tional
  • Frustrating

    All companies should just stop innovating. Test products behind closed doors and only release sure hits. That will drive innovation for sure......

    I have always considered myself to be a Microsoft guy, but at least Google is pushing the envelope here. I really don't see how there is anything wrong with that.

    The only ones who can possibly be faulted for anything are the geese who are dropping $1500 on this soon to be obsolete model. But then again who am I to tell people how to spend their money?
    SovereignTechnology
  • Actually - no... it was a error... they aren't for sale.

    "Now everyone (with $1,500 to burn) can be a "Glasshole.""

    Even if it were true - it's 'everyone' who lives in the US. That's only one person in 24 in the world or 4% - a long way from 'everyone'.
    TheWerewolf