Google pulls plug on Wave, but not in Chrome

Google pulls plug on Wave, but not in Chrome

Summary: Google has finally closed the doors on its Wave social networking service but is still allowing Google Chrome users to access the pages in read-only mode.The company said it was pulling the plug on the ill-fated Wave project in November 2011, citing 30 April as the last day that users would still be able to access their Waves, although it had not been actively developing it since late 2010.

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TOPICS: Mobility
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Google has finally closed the doors on its Wave social networking service but is still allowing Google Chrome users to access the pages in read-only mode.

The company said it was pulling the plug on the ill-fated Wave project in November 2011, citing 30 April as the last day that users would still be able to access their Waves, although it had not been actively developing it since late 2010.

However, at the time of writing the service is still accessible in read-only mode and is still offering users the option of exporting individual Waves as an HTML or PDF file for users visiting with the Google Chrome browser. Visiting wave.google.com using Internet Explorer or Firefox redirected ZDNet UK to the closure information page.

Google had not responded to a request for comment.

Despite a lack of enthusiasm for the Wave service under Google's stewardship, the project has continued as an open-source project as part of the Apache Foundation and is now called Apache Wave. The project is currently in incubation stage but developers can contribute to the Google Wave Protocol project.

While the project did not receive great support from users under Google it did provide inspiration for features that made it into other Google projects, such as the collaborative working features now found in Google Docs.

Since announcing the closure of Wave, Google is hoping that Google+ can fulfill its social networking ambitions.

Topic: Mobility

Ben Woods

About Ben Woods

With several years' experience covering everything in the world of telecoms and mobility, Ben's your man if it involves a smartphone, tablet, laptop, or any other piece of tech small enough to carry around with you.

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  • This article is not complete without mentioning the startups that found Google Wave to be so productive for their own work, that they were literally forced to develop their own products.

    There are several:

    * http://rizzoma.com/ - free and open source, it continues and expands the Google Wave philosophy with cool features like tasks and Twitter-like mentions.

    * http://co-meeting.com/ - very similar to Google Wave at first glance, but seems to focus more on meetings.

    * http://runby.me/ - a B2B service for companies that go heavy on text-based communications. It is designed to support both email and hosted conversations within a single UX, allows to assign tasks and keep track of them, and has built-in workflows for general communications, helpdesk, Kanban and sales.

    I bet there are others out there. Google Wave was not about social - it was a business communication tool that was not positioned and packaged properly.
    anonymous