Groggle bamboozled by new legal bid

Groggle bamboozled by new legal bid

Summary: As Google is granted a one-month extension to lodge opposition to the Groggle trademark, discount alcohol search website Boozle has registered its own last-minute opposition to the same trademark.

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TOPICS: Google
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As Google is granted a one-month extension to lodge opposition to the Groggle trademark, discount alcohol search website Boozle has registered its own last-minute opposition to the same trademark.

As reported on Tuesday, Google had sought a one-month extension with IP Australia in order to allow further discussion with the Australian founders of Groggle. That application has been successful, according to IP Australia.

Groggle was set for more grief, as on the very same day, Rohan Wallace Patent and Trade Mark Services lodged opposition to the trademark on behalf of Boozle.

Groggle co-founder Cameron Collie told ZDNet Australia that in light of the negotiations with Google, the objection from Boozle came completely out of the blue.

"I can't believe it, to be honest," he said, vowing to fight Boozle's opposition to the trademark.

Boozle offers similar location-based alcohol price comparisons on its website to Groggle, but Collie believes the two sites are very different. According to Collie, Groggle has an "eBay-style" system where alcohol retailers log in and post alcohol pricing information themselves, while Boozle relies on administrators to update pricing information.

Boozle had not responded to requests for comment at the time of writing.

With opposition lodged, Boozle now has three months to detail to IP Australia its reasons for opposing Groggle's trademark, which Groggle then has another three months to respond. In six months time a hearing will be held by IP Australia to determine the validity of Boozle's opposition to the Groggle trademark.

In the meantime, Collie revealed his lawyer has sent a letter to Google detailing how Groggle can alleviate Google's concerns about any possible confusion between the two sites, including putting a disclaimer on the website and ensuring the colour scheme is in no way similar to the one used by the internet giant. Collie said he is hopeful these measures will lead to an amicable resolution with Google.

Topic: Google

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Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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  • How about we cut through all the legal hassle and just become part of the "usa" where litigation is a way of life.

    I have enough trouble with Google vs Groggle unless Google suddenly decides that one of it's random graphic changes includes spelling "Google" in beer-bottles.

    Boozle vs Groggle. No name confusion whatsoever. If the argument is over business-model, that has nothing to do with the name! I think "Boozle" have been consuming too much of their own product!
    Treknology
  • Wow, what a load of horse manure. Google & Boozle both need their tampons changed, regularly. Hey Google, what happened with "don't be evil"?
    alfielee@...