HP launches big data platform, integrates acquired analytics parts

HP launches big data platform, integrates acquired analytics parts

Summary: The platform, called HAVEn, combines technologies from HP Autonomy, Vertica, ArcSight and Operations Management along with Hadoop. Most of those parts were acquired by HP in recent years.

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Hewlett-Packard on Tuesday launched a big data platform dubbed HAVEn in a bid to bundle its analytics software, hardware and services into one easy to consume package.

The move comes as HP kicks off its Discover conference in Las Vegas.

HAVEn combines technologies from HP Autonomy, Vertica, ArcSight and Operations Management along with Hadoop. Most of those parts were acquired by HP in recent years.

HP is betting that more than 700 connectors to HAVEn will help customers avoid lock-in via an open architecture. HP also has support for multiple virtualization technologies and optimized hardware.

In other words, HP is selling you a big data stack from one vendor with the ability to integrate other analytical tools.

The first big data effort built on HAVEn is HP Operations Analytics, which is a combination of IT operational data from tools from ArcSight and the company's business service management products. Third party data sources will also be ingested. HP is rounding out the effort with analytics services.

HP's big data consulting practice is crack at moving the company's services unit beyond maintenance and to higher level enterprise dealings.

In addition, HP launched the HP Vertica Community Edition, a free version that allows customers to analyze 1 terabyte of data before trading up to enterprise grade. Autonomy also has a legacy data cleanup application. Here's a look at HP's slide pitching HAVEn and the stack. 

havenslide

 

Topics: Big Data, Enterprise Software, Hewlett-Packard

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  • Still trying to sell the big iron?

    HP has seen its revenue from personal computers, servers and printers decrease repeatedly in the past years. So starting from 2009 HP put a lot more emphasis on services - the proportion of service revenue in the total sales grew from 17% in 2008 to 29% in 2013. Still, its services are low margin (20.4% operational profit margin in 2012) compared to those of others (for instance Oracle earned in its financial year 2012 an amazing 87% operational margin on software maintenance).
    So HP is bound to change something. Ms. Whitman has decreed 2012 "the first year in a multi-year journey to turn HP around", whatever that means. For me this multi-year strategy is still unclear.
    Bundling together commodity iron with not yet mature or commercially successful software seems more like an attempt to up-sell or cross-sell (or to make at least something out of that expensive Autonomy acquisition) rather than the much anticipated and much expected solution.
    bogdancioc@...