IDC's tablet forecast skips RT, sees Android decline

IDC's tablet forecast skips RT, sees Android decline

Summary: IDC has increased its forecast for sales of media consumption tablets for 2012-16, while predicting a decline in Android's market share. The new forecast also ignores tablets running Microsoft's Windows RT, though the research company says it plans to add these from the next quarter.

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TOPICS: Tech Industry
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IDC has increased its forecast for sales of media consumption tablets for 2012-16, while predicting a decline in Android's market share. The new forecast also ignores tablets running Microsoft's Windows RT, though the research company says it plans to add these from the next quarter.

IDC's "expectations of strong demand for media tablets in the second half of 2012" have led the company to predict sales of 107.4 million units for this year, up from 106.1 million units. It has also slightly increased its forecast for 2013 -- now 142.8 million units -- and expects worldwide shipments to reach 222.1 million units in 2016, according to a statement.

However, it does not predict that tablets running Google Android will continue to gain ground, as they did in the smartphone segment. The market share of tablets running Apple's iOS (ie the iPad) fell from 76.2 percent in 2010 to 58.2 percent in 2011, while Android tablets increased their market share from 23.5 percent to 38.8 percent. Nonetheless, IDC predicts this trend will reverse. It expects iOS to have a market share of 62.5 percent this year (up by four points) and 60.8 percent in 2016.

IDC Tablet predictions

By 2016, of course, the market could look different. IDC doesn't include Windows 8 or Windows RT tablets in its Media Tablet Tracker -- they're in the PC Tracker forecast -- but will switch them over from the next quarter. IDC says it will bring "all tablet slates, regardless of OS or processor type, into the Media Tablet Tracker".

Whether Windows-based tablets will sell remains to be seen. Tom Mainelli, IDC's research director for Mobile Connected Devices, says:

"Our current thinking, based upon early pricing expectations for these products, is that Windows-based tablets will be largely additive to our existing media tablet market forecast. We don't expect Windows-based tablets to necessarily take share from Apple and Android, but will grow the overall tablet market."

It appears that Windows RT tablets will cost significantly more than iOS and particularly Android tablets, especially if a report at VR-Zone is correct. In Microsoft charges Tablet OEMs a whopping $85 for Windows RT, the site says it surveyed manufacturers at Computex and was given quotes of "$80-95 dollars, with $85 being the most commonly quoted price".

While $85 is extremely cheap for a copy of Windows and Microsoft Office, it's very expensive for an ARM-based tablet. On this basis, Windows RT tablets look unlikely to dent iPad sales.

@jackschofield

Topic: Tech Industry

Jack Schofield

About Jack Schofield

Jack Schofield spent the 1970s editing photography magazines before becoming editor of an early UK computer magazine, Practical Computing. In 1983, he started writing a weekly computer column for the Guardian, and joined the staff to launch the newspaper's weekly computer supplement in 1985. This section launched the Guardian’s first website and, in 2001, its first real blog. When the printed section was dropped after 25 years and a couple of reincarnations, he felt it was a time for a change....

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  • This is suicide. But then, their entire Windows 8 strategy is looking that way.

    Enterprises aren't going to touch Windows 8 with a barge pole on the corporate desktop. Now Microsoft thinks they can take in the market leader in ARM tablets than charging *more*?

    Remember that Windows RT (formerly Windows on Arm or WOA) throws away Microsoft's normal trump card, in that it won't run any of a customer's existing Windows programs. Only the intel-based tablets will do that, and even then, the customer would likely have to fork out for tablet-ready upgrades (assuming that the 3rd-party software makers even bother, of course).
    BrownieBoy-4ea41