JBoss gets Nuked

JBoss gets Nuked

Summary: It's PostNuke, but not as we know it. A Java version of the popular open-source content management system will be available from next month, says the JBoss Group

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JBoss Group, the people behind the eponymous open-source Java application server, next month plans to release the final version of its content management system based on the popular PostNuke and PHPNuke.

Nukes on JBoss is a Java-based version of the 'Nuke' family of open-source content management systems originally written in PHP. Release Candidate 1 has been available for download since December, and the final release date has now been set for 18 February.

JBoss Group began the project after trying to implement PostNuke for its Web site, but found the PHP-based application did not scale well enough. After analysing the PHP codebase, said the company, they found what they called "dubious" ways of caching data and decided to port the framework to JBoss.

Nukes on JBoss authors Marc Fleury and Julien Viet were damning about some aspects of the PHP-based predecessor in an article they wrote last year, despite acknowledging in the same article the amazing feat that the programmers of PostNuke have accomplished. "It appeared that for the security components (highly developed in PostNuke), the engine went back to the database every time. Clearly this was a scalability mistake, as it means that every Web request goes to the database and does a query. We understand what the PHP LAMP crowd means when they say 'database-driven applications'." LAMP refers to applications that use the Linux operating system, Apache Web server, MySQL database and PHP scripting language.

Aside from problems with scalability, the JBoss developers decided they needed a Java solution, and said they could find no existing open-source Java content management systems.

"Among the open-source solutions currently available, Java or otherwise, we were unable to find a single product that met our functional and performance needs," said Sacha Labourey, general manager of JBoss Group Europe. The company's Web site now runs on the ported Nukes.

JBoss says the fact that Nukes runs on its application server means that Enterprise Java Beans can be used to cache data more effectively than is done in the original PHP implementation, resulting in a 20-fold performance increase. The JBoss implementation also enables remote Flash invocations, which means Web site developers can create interactions between Flash and Nukes components.

Topics: Apps, Software Development

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  • Good Nuke ... Bad Nuke

    I contributed modules such as MetaMaker, and HostScanner to PHP Nuke, but have since stopped. The problem with PHP Nuke is that it isn't realy open source in the usual sense. You have to pay to use it commercially, and there are a lot of other restrictions, so most people over 20 won;t take it seriously as an open source framework. The end result of the restrictions is that not a lot of mature core developers bother to inspect the code. This makes the framework really vulnerable to hackers. There have been plenty of patches to address this, but recent releases have been downright crippling to servers to the point that some ISPs ban PHP Nuke.

    I can see why the JBoss guys went to roll their own. They simply got frustrated with a good thing that could be so much better.
    anonymous