Linux Minted

Linux Minted

Summary: Yesterday I installed Linux Mint 12, almost officially the world's most popular Linux distro, made easy for simpletons such as myself. I was swayed by ZDNet contributor Jamie Watson, as he has detailed the progress of Linux Mint 12 thoroughly.

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Yesterday I installed Linux Mint 12, almost officially the world's most popular Linux distro, made easy for simpletons such as myself. I was swayed by ZDNet contributor Jamie Watson, as he has detailed the progress of Linux Mint 12 thoroughly.

It's kind of based on Ubuntu 11.10 'Oneiric Ocelot', with the main distinction being the inclusion of GNOME 3 and the beautifully crafted bridging of old and new features using Mint GNOME Shell Extensions. As they say themselves "It’s a brand new desktop but with traditional components."

The installation was a breeze. The biggest problem has been my own stupidity -- I have been smugly backing up regularly for months, using a lovely piece of software called Grsync. However, a backup is only as good as the restoration. I never tested to see if my backups were working, and they weren't. Oops.

Luckily most of my work is online or in my head.

I've also had to adapt a bit as well: with great sadness I've stopped using GNOME Do as GNOME 3 has a built-in quick launcher, activated with the Windows key. This is a combination of the Mac Exposé), favourites and search input.

GNOME 3 quick launcher
The GNOME 3 quick launcher expose-type screen

Overall though, I am pretty impressed. There are some occasional graphics artefacts but the system as a whole does feel more responsive and, as with Ubuntu, things just work, particularly VLC and the evil Flash plugin.

If you do use the sublime Sublime text editor, a proprietary license but cross-platform and TextMate compatible, then Andrew at Web Upd8 has created a PPA so that you can add the PPA and install Sublime using a software manager.

Topic: Software Development

Jake Rayson

About Jake Rayson

A web designer since the 20th century, I am a pragmatic advocate of Free Software and I use proprietary software when appropriate. I made the full-time switch to Linux back in 2007, and my desktop tools of choice are Linux Mint, Inkscape, GIMP and Sublime Text.

As a Front End Developer, my core skills are HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery, and my working life reflects my commitment to open standards and accessible websites (ie accessible by everyone, regardless of browser, platform, ability or technology).

For web publishing platforms, I use WordPress for ease of use and Drupal for more complex solutions.

I am also learning about Ruby, Rails, Sinatra and CoffeeScript. I like the minimalist Ruby Way. To this end, my personal portfolio website is built with NestaCMS.

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2 comments
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  • Hi Jake - I'm very pleased to hear that something I wrote was useful to you. I agree with you about Mint 12 - I had actually started to move away from the Mint/Ubuntu line in favor of the Mint/Debian series, but I have found that Mint 12 is so nice that I have moved back in that direction. You're absolutely right about the "just works" situation, for both software and hardware. Of all the different systems I have, the only thing that doesn't work with Mint 12 is the blasted Synaptic ClickPad, and I have long since given up hope for that in general anyway.

    jw
    j.a.watson@...
  • @jw: It Just Works and Zero Config are probably guiding principles for Ubuntu & Linux Mint!
    Jake Rayson