Microsoft fixes bad patch detection

Microsoft fixes bad patch detection

Summary: Several of the security updates released by Microsoft this past Tuesday repeatedly offered themselves even after installation. This has been fixed. If you have hidden the update, unhide it and install.

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TOPICS: Security, Microsoft
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One of the many problems Microsoft has had lately with their software updates is that several of the updates in the last group, released on Tuesday September 10, had a detection error: For many users, even after apparently accepting and installing the update, several would keep offering for install in Windows Update, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) or System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM).

The company has reissued the following patches to address the problem:

Microsoft says that there are no changes in the actual updates, just in the detection of the update on the system. Customers who have already successfully installed the update need not take any action.

Many users hid the update in order to avoid the notifications. These users should unhide the update and install.

Topics: Security, Microsoft

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19 comments
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  • Doesn't Windows Have Decent Package Management?

    Consider a Linux distro like Debian: its integrated package management provides automatic dependency and version tracking. If a package you have installed has an update available, it will tell you. If that requires updated versions of other packages, that will be automatically handled as well. If something doesn't need updating, it won't be automatically updated.

    Seems like Microsoft has no clue about any of this. Every single patch update they distribute seems to have its own hard-coded version/dependency checking and installer. So every new update is a new chance to get all these things wrong: update a system that's already updated, clobber the wrong files with the wrong versions, and all kinds of other stuffups that are well-known to Windows users.
    ldo17
  • I'm experiencing problems with another set of patches.

    Specifically:

    KB2760588
    KB2760583
    KB2760411

    I had to hide them as the system continuously offered to install them.
    ye
    • I'm experiencing problems with another set of patches - me too !!

      KB2760588; KB2760583; KB2760411 - Office 2007 on Win XP, Win Vista and Win 7 systems

      I needed to hide this items (KB's) as the system continuously offered to install them... so this finally resulted in multiple installs of this KB's. Is this an issue ?? How to solve this "problem ?
      Microsoft: pls provide a solution ASAP !!!
      adelin.lambert@...
  • primary reason I use OSX now.

    These posts are reinforcing my Mac purchases. I don't miss the frequent updates and issues which used to prevent me from working for up to 30 mins at a time.
    WntermuteCA
    • I use a Mac.

      It's pretty much the exact same thing, so I'm not sure how you're justifying anything.
      ForeverCookie
      • Actually

        OS X is updates less frequently with bigger chunks.

        I guess some people like spending a HUGE amount of time few times instead of spending less time more often when it comes to patches.
        Michael Alan Goff
        • I don't spend any time with either.

          Apple and Microsoft have made patching a fairly transparent process. Same with UNIX. The only time I think about patching is when I have to update my Solaris systems. And that's because I have custom builds of some applications which require me to build from source code.
          ye
    • Oh please

      Macs have problems too. To pretend they don't is foolish.
      ye
    • no, you just have to wait 6-10 months

      while Apple takes it's sweet time to recognize the exploit. Then you wait another 2-3 months for a patch.
      Rob.sharp
  • Hidden Windows updates from last week's patch day

    Today, I clicked on restore hidden updates (KB2760588; KB2760583; KB2760411, the ones that Windows update continued to present for installation even after they were installed. I had hidden them as many others did. The restore process didn't return them today.
    I presume that Windows update now detects them as having been installed. No further action was necessary.
    denwilgor
  • Updates

    I had to hide an update KB2810072 for Microsoft One Note that just wouldn't install :-(
    bvonr@...
  • Repeating Windows updates go on and on and on...

    I have been experiencing Windows (XP) updates that repeat themselves for the last year or more, and just with the ones cited in Larry's article. It is all too common.

    IMHO, Microsoft needs to go to school to learn how to do updates well. Windows 7 has another update horror show. Woe unto you if automatic updates are turned on and you are out somewhere with your laptop, and you go to shut down your laptop. Wait a minute, Win 7 update says. Don't power down your system just yet. Updates must be installed first. So you heed the warning and miss your plane? Oh, and then next time you power on, Win 7 spins its wheels finishing the updates and asks to reboot again. Or maybe does not even ask, and simply reboots. Who on earth designed Win 7 updates??? .. Ben
    ben_myers@...
  • An update on Windows XP updates

    I just ran Windows XP update and made sure all the patches were unchecked. I guess I'd hidden 26 of them previously, plus the separate install of the .NET 3.5 update. Let's see what happens when the update completes.
    ben_myers@...
    • Sadly

      your complaining about a 12 year old operating system? Please stop, a lot has changed since then. And no mater how much you hate it there are justified reasons for they way Windows handles patches. The steps MS has taken to improve security is undeniable. Forced reboots are to prevent idiots from running without a reboot. Why patch, only to keep the hole open because you don't want to save a doc or lose your favorite XXX pop up?
      Rob.sharp
      • And you are missing the point!

        Just now, I installed 26 sets of Windows XP updates. If you want the KB numbers, I did capture them. Windows XP did not ask me to reboot. I rebooted anyway, then ran Microsoft Update again. Guess what? The same 26 updates, plus a few more. It makes absolutely no sense that Microsoft cannot keep its damnable patches straight. They've taken something simple and turned it into bad rocket science.

        Why am I running XP? Because I run a lot of pretty specialized software, and, despite the fact that I like Windows 7 overall, I am hesitant to spend a couple of days migrating to Windows 7, only to find that my specialized software will not run, no way, no how.

        I am not living my life solely to update stupid Windows and to figure out which patches did or did not get properly applied. Whether we are talking about Windows XP or Windows 7 (and please, let's not talk about Vista or Windows 8!), it is Microsoft's role to make their operating system secure and to keep it that way. Microsoft has failed the world miserably in this regard and we all pay the price. The underlying problem in all this is the sheer complexity of the design of Windows, much of which has come about through acquistions and P**S poor integration of what they acquired. Let's all hope that automakers and airplane manufacturers do not get the lame idea to use Windows for command-and-control systems!

        I am not a Linux bigot like SJVN or some of the other folk in this world. I have used Windows for a very very long time, but it is starting to tire me out... Ben Myers
        ben_myers@...
  • For those of you keeping score at home...

    Here are the updates Windows XP's Microsoft Update wants to install again, and again, and again. And you wonder I seem a little angry?

    Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 x86 (KB2533523)
    Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 x86 (KB2468871)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2656351)
    Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2600217)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2604121)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2604092)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2656352)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2737019)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2729450)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2729449)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2742595)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2742596)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2756918)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2789642)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2789643)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2804576)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2804577)
    Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2836939)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2835393)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2833940)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2832411)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Server 2008 x86 (KB2832407)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 4 on XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 x86 (KB2840628)
    Security Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2844285)
    Update for Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP x86 (KB2836941)
    Microsoft MS Security Essentials
    Definition Update for Microsoft Security Essentials - KB2310138 (Definition 1.159.9.0)
    ben_myers@...
    • RE: For those of you keeping score at home...

      Perhaps you should troubleshoot WHY those patches are failing to install and being retried ?

      It's not hard. There are log files and event log entries.
      klashbrook@...
      • There is no indication given that patch installations have failed!

        There is no indication given that patch installations have failed! It says right there 20-something patches installed successfully.
        ben_myers@...
    • RE: For those of you keeping score at home...

      You definitely have something wrong with your OS.
      Up until recently I ran XP and had no problems with any of the listed updates.
      It appears that possibly your .net files are corrupt.
      How about trying to uninstall each .net system then reinstalling them?

      first uninstall all of them.
      Then get the earliest one.
      Then go to updates and install each update individually starting with the
      earliest. Yes you will have to reboot numerous times but that's the breaks. The later system will be offered as you progress.

      The .net systems are sensitive systems and if you try to install mass updates all at once on XP more than likely it will screw up.
      Good luck!
      golowenow