Microsoft targets alleged NZ piracy

Microsoft targets alleged NZ piracy

Summary: Microsoft has settled with three companies from New Zealand which were accused of selling unlicensed software.

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TOPICS: Legal
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Microsoft has settled with three companies from New Zealand which were accused of selling unlicensed software.

The companies, TDM Technology Limited, Pars TV and PCTown were only some of those accused of the practice, with two further companies deciding not to settle. They will be facing the software behemoth in the Auckland District Court, according to a statement issued by Microsoft this afternoon.

Last November also saw two High Court proceedings against Auckland-based traders who were charged with selling counterfeit Microsoft software, which the company thought had been sourced from China.

"Piracy creates unfair market conditions for resellers, and in the current economic climate, every cent of revenue is critical," Microsoft's NZ country manager Kevin Ackhurst claimed in a statement. "We cannot stand idly by while our channel partners and customers are at risk, and will continue to take responsible actions to ensure the safety and vitality of the local software economy."

ZDNet.com.au is attempting to contact the companies concerned.

The New Zealand action follows a similar initiative by Microsoft in Australia in October last year. The company took three Australian individuals to court for what the software giant claimed was trade in pirated and counterfeit software.

Topic: Legal

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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3 comments
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  • Microsoft PRODUCTs

    If only Micro$oft sells its software at a reasonable price and not force users to upgrade at every twists and turns whenever they upgrade their OS or softwares or at least make them backward compatible, then users will be more friendly to Micro$oft, otherwise Micro$oft will always be viewed as the evil software empire that it is where the main motivation is making more and more money and stealing ideas from other developers/users most especially, the open source community.
    anonymous
  • Come now

    This article is not about individuals who chose to obtain unlicensed products without giving Microsoft any money for the software they invested millions of dollars to make, it's about companies who sell to end users machines with unlicensed copies of Microsoft software, claim that it's legit and pocket the profit. It's fraud.

    There is no reason an individual should have to use Microsoft's products against their will. If you don't like the price Microsoft chooses to sell their products for, choose to not purchase it. It's simple economics.
    anonymous
  • But M$ is a known software pirate!!!

    I was on the team of five which developed the very first electronic spreadsheet at Harvard Business School in 1978-9. That was released as 'Visicalc' for those old enough to remember. It was copied to become Lotus 123, but Lotus eventually settled the case by paying US$2m. M$ also copied the 'look and feel' (ie same as Lotus) but has never paid a cent to the inventor (my classmate Dan Bricklin)..
    Similarly, M$ stole all the good features of Word Perfect, till M$ Word was comparable.
    Just now there is a case where a guy showed M$ some security routines, M$ said they weren't interested, then immediately copied the work.
    So I propose that M$ is a known software pirate... and the best defence for those now standing accused by M$ is to claim that it is known max that "There is no honour among thieves". In other words, they should simply cite the facts that M$ keeps stealing others' software, and then see how unlikely M$ will be to prosecute. Further, one could cite that multiple-felon M$ shows contempt for the law, and hence should not be granted the protection of the law.

    But, finally, why don't people just pull together a good Ubuntu install with Open Office, Firefox etc, and forget M$ software, rather than stealing it!
    anonymous