Photo Galleries

Toshiba Pocket PC e750

Toshiba Pocket PC e750

One of the few drawbacks of Toshiba's Wi-Fi-enabled <A href="http://reviews.zdnet.co.uk/review/12/1/1494.html">e740</A> was its less than stellar screen. So it comes as no surprise that the company has endowed that model's successor, the e750, with a much-improved display. There's more good news: Toshiba has also thrown in an extra 32MB of storage space and slightly refined the design, making a good handheld even better. If Toshiba had also tossed in a juicy software package to sweeten the pot, the e750 would be irresistible. As it stands, however, the e750 -- which launches in the UK on 7 April -- remains a desirable handheld for power users.

April 2, 2003 by in Mobility

Netgear DG824M

Netgear DG824M

If you've got more than one computer at home, and are thinking of using ADSL to connect them to the Internet, you've got two choices. Either you go for wired Ethernet and put up with Cat5 cables strewn around the house -- which may or may not be acceptable to you and/or your co-habitees -- or you pay a little extra and go wireless, leaving everything neat and tidy. If the main use of your home network is for Internet access rather than for transferring huge files between your home computers, then 11Mbps 802.11b wireless Ethernet will give you ample performance; 54Mbps 802.11g is very nice, but given that the average home ADSL connection is only 512Kbps then it's wasted.

April 2, 2003 by in Reviews

NEC Versa T400

NEC Versa T400

Following its launch late last year, we’re still waiting for the Tablet PC to come of age. True, the first crop of releases contained some promising examples, such as Toshiba’s convertible <A href="http://reviews.zdnet.co.uk/review/13/1/2218.html"> Portégé 3500</A> and the slate-style <A href="http://reviews.zdnet.co.uk/review/13/1/2221.html"> Stylistic ST4110</A> from Fujitsu Siemens. But in the main, the devices were too big and heavy, and lacking in both performance and battery life.

April 1, 2003 by in Mobility

Canon i950

Canon i950

As successor to the popular but discontinued Canon S900 photo printer, the Canon i950 doubles the S900's resolution and halves its dot size. The result: this photo printer is quick, compact and attractively priced. Most importantly, however, it delivers high-quality pictures for photographers on a budget.

March 31, 2003 by in Printers

PaperPort Pro 9 Office

PaperPort Pro 9 Office

PaperPort is touted as the data hoarder's saviour -- a document management system that can help you sort, organise and, importantly, retrieve any document you may need. Its built-in OCR engine allows you to convert scanned (or photographed) material into an editable form. This means that PaperPort is in a position to manage every aspect of your work and home life, from credit card bills and baby photos to crucial reports and expenses claim forms.

March 28, 2003 by in Developer

GoldMine 6.0 Business Contact Manager

GoldMine 6.0 Business Contact Manager

GoldMine is a business contact manager that competes with the likes of Maximizer, OfficeTalk, ACT! and Outlook. Like all of these products, it stores details of your business contacts -- names, addresses and telephone numbers -- and also provides workgroup scheduling, email messaging, document management and calendar functions such as appointments and to-do lists. It's designed to be equally suited to small businesses and individuals.

March 27, 2003 by in Developer

Vodafone Mobile Connect Card

Vodafone Mobile Connect Card

Vodafone calls its Mobile Connect Card 'The world's largest mobile office', claiming that this package will allow you to get connected anywhere in the world with a compatible network. It comprises a PC Card GPRS adapter, accompanying software and a network contract that allows you to use GPRS data services with your notebook. This means getting a separate contract for data use, but whether this is a plus or minus depends on your particular circumstances. Most of all though, Vodafone claims that this package is simple to install and use, even for non-technical users –- and that's almost right.

March 25, 2003 by in Hardware

QuickBooks Premier 2003

QuickBooks Premier 2003

Firmly established as one of the leading UK small business bookkeeping packages, Intuit's QuickBooks has managed to introduce new features every year. Sometimes they're relative duds, like remote access to your accounts (how often will you require that?); sometimes they're more useful, like the ability to split incoming payments over more than one job for the same customer. Last year's big idea was the ability to process credit card payments online. This requires a QuickBooks Merchant Account to process your credit card receipts online directly from QuickBooks. Credit cards also feature in one of QuickBooks's payment options, letting you email invoices as PDFs to your customers, which they can then pay electronically.

March 25, 2003 by in Developer

IRCXpro Server

IRCXpro Server

Setting up your own IRC server sounds like a geeky thing to do, but in fact there are good reasons why a small business or an individual who collaborates on projects might want to do so. In contrast to teleconferencing, you can easily tell who is speaking and log what they say for later review. It’s also extremely low-cost and accessible to even the slowest computers and Internet connections – or for that matter a mobile phone or handheld user.

March 24, 2003 by in Developer

Sony CLIE PEG-SJ33

Sony CLIE PEG-SJ33

Hot on the heels of the PEG-SJ30 comes Sony's newest CLIE, the SJ33. It seems that the company has taken criticism of the SJ30 to heart, for the new model is different and better designed than its elder sibling, boasting a slick clamshell configuration and integrated MP3 playback. Although the SJ33 is not without flaws, its improvements far outweigh its imperfections, making it a good handheld for the money.

March 19, 2003 by in Mobility

Dell Inspiron 8500

Dell Inspiron 8500

Dell should bundle a big supply of popcorn with its new Inspiron 8500 series, because the laptop's awesome 15.4in. wide-aspect display will have you watching DVD movies all night. This completely redesigned desktop replacement system has plenty more in store as well, including the fastest Mobile Pentium 4-M processors, integrated dual-band antennae for 802.11b and 802.11g wireless and excellent performance. All of these features are wrapped in a silver case that you can customise with QuickSnap lid covers in a variety of colours. For all that it offers, the Inspiron 8500 range's £1,256 (ex. VAT) starting price is reasonable. Any way you look at it, you'd be hard-pressed to come up with a cooler, faster desktop replacement notebook than the Inspiron 8500 series, which is why it's an Editors' Choice in this category.

March 18, 2003 by in Laptops

Panasonic LF-D521 DVD Burner II

Panasonic LF-D521 DVD Burner II

Panasonic is making a concerted effort to see DVD-RAM take off more widely outside Japan, where it has enjoyed huge success. DVD-RAM is one of the formats, alongside DVD-R and DVD-RW, that is supported by the 219-strong DVD Forum. The big advantage of DVD-RAM over DVD-R/-RW (and the DVD+R/+RW formats supported by the 55-member DVD alliance) is that it does not require special burning software: files can be dragged and dropped using any file manager utility. A second advantage is the durability: DVD-RAM discs can be rewritten up to 100,000 times -- in contrast to the 1,000 rewrites supported by DVD-RW and DVD+RW standards.

March 17, 2003 by in Storage

InFocus LP650

InFocus LP650

InFocus has been producing business projectors for a long time now, and is known for high-quality and occasionally innovative products. Although the LP650's optical specification is respectable, it's not amazing. However, in line with the company's business focus, this is a network-connected, controllable and manageable projector that's designed primarily for the corporate meeting room. It's just a shame that it requires some proprietary software to achieve this.

March 14, 2003 by in Hardware

Dell Latitude D600

Dell Latitude D600

The thin-and-light Latitude D600 series, based on the new Pentium M processor, marks the start of an ambitious new corporate look for Dell. Not only has the company redesigned all of its popular Latitude laptops, it has also reworked its docking stations, port replicators, and media modules. The notebooks carry the very latest components, including Pentium M processors and Intel's new 855 chipset. The D600 series isn't always a true-blue Centrino, but it can be. The company offers either the Centrino-completing Intel PRO/Wireless 2100 Mini-PCI card, known as Calexico, or Dell Computer's own TrueMobile Wi-Fi Mini-PCI cards, supporting 802.11b/g or a/b/g. If your corporate budget includes money for a new notebook line, the Latitude D series is a wise way to spend it.

March 13, 2003 by in Laptops

Sony VAIO PCG-Z1SP

Sony VAIO PCG-Z1SP

Thin, light and stylish, Sony's VAIO PCG-Z1SP, which will be available on 17 March, has all the designer chic that a fashion-conscious user could wish for. But beneath the surface gloss, does this 1.5GHz Pentium M/Centrino system deliver the goods in terms of performance and battery life? Our testing of this pre-production unit suggests that although performance is very good, you may need to buy the optional extended-life battery to put this system's mains-free longevity on a par with competing Pentium M/Centrino systems.

March 12, 2003 by in Laptops

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All

Most Popular