Photo Galleries

Logitech Cordless MouseMan Optical

Logitech Cordless MouseMan Optical

Until recently you had two options for upgrading your mouse. You could ditch the roller ball in favour of an optical mouse, or you could cut the cord and go with a cordless mouse. With Logitech’s Cordless MouseMan Optical, you can have the freedom of a cordless mouse along with the precision of an optical mouse. It truly is a beautiful marriage.

November 1, 2002 in Hardware

Sony VPL-CX5

Sony VPL-CX5

Sony has put its usual sleek, stylish spin on a product and come up with the VPL-CX5 projector. Slimline, lightweight and bright, it also includes a Memory Stick slot, allowing you to give presentations without a notebook. Although the styling and some of Sony's publicity may suggest that this is a home cinema projector, its feature set makes it far more suitable for presentation work.

October 31, 2002 by in Hardware

Orange SPV

Orange SPV

If a phone is something you pull out of its packaging, charge up, and then start dialling numbers with, then the SPV from Orange -- the first Smartphone 2002 (formerly codenamed 'Stinger') device on the market -- isn't a phone. Instead of a 'phone book' and a simple SMS tool, it has Pocket Outlook. You can also browse full-colour Web pages with Pocket Internet Explorer. But you won't just plug it in and use these features – indeed, many people will never use these features. This is a shame, because once you have the SPV (it stands for Sound, Pictures, Video) set up, it really is rather neat.

October 30, 2002 by in Mobility

Palm Tungsten T

Palm Tungsten T

The Tungsten T is Palm's first device to run Palm OS 5.0. It's also the company's first model to feature a convertible design, built-in Bluetooth, and stereo sound. Like Palm's earlier high-end units, the Palm V and the Palm m515, the Tungsten is a sleek, elegantly designed handheld that's a bit of a status symbol. This attractive device performs well, too, but it's not quite as polished as it should be, considering its price tag.

October 29, 2002 by in Mobility

Premiere 6.5

Premiere 6.5

For years now, Adobe’s Premiere has been the chosen non-linear editing (NLE) application of choice for video professionals and enthusiasts alike. However, it has recently been showing signs of age. The question is, has the launch of Premiere 6.5 addressed the shortfalls of version 6? Or will we still be waiting for the elusive version 7 to be released?

October 28, 2002 by in Developer

Asus SpaceLink WL-300 Access Point

Asus SpaceLink WL-300 Access Point

The SpaceLink WL-300 from Asus is a compact 802.11b access point offering no-frills, low-cost wireless networking. Its throughput isn't outstanding, and there are some quirks to the management software, but if you're on a tight budget but would like to try wireless networking, this is probably the cheapest way of doing it.

October 25, 2002 by in Reviews

D-Link AirPlus DI-614+

D-Link AirPlus DI-614+

As dozens of ‘me-too’ products continue to crowd the Wi-Fi market, D-Link differentiates itself with its inexpensive AirPlus DI-614+ wireless router. Underneath its sleek, silver-and-grey styling, the unit houses an enhanced Texas Instruments 802.11b chip that supports a fast 22Mbps mode. Aimed at small office/home office users, the DI-614+ delivers ease of use, good performance and exceptional security. Unfortunately, we found its range and warranty disappointing.

October 25, 2002 by in Reviews

Microsoft Works Suite 2003

Microsoft Works Suite 2003

Let's be clear: this isn’t an office suite. Microsoft Works Suite 2003's new design and bundled applications clearly mark it out for students and anyone who needs productivity software at home: all but the tiniest of businesses should look elsewhere. This suite's less complicated programs cannot perform the same complex calculations as Excel, nor can they generate presentations as dynamic as those of PowerPoint. But for a mere £119 (inc. VAT), this suite contains plenty of family-friendly applications: a slick, Web-style task launcher; a simple spreadsheet; a database; a calendar; an address book; a fully functional copy of Word 2002; and a bunch of bonus software, including a mapping program, an encyclopaedia, a personal finance program and an image editor. If you can do without Excel or PowerPoint, this bargain home-productivity suite is the best software deal that Microsoft has to offer. Businesses, though, should stick with the Office suite, even if it is overpriced.

October 23, 2002 by in Developer

Pocketop Portable Keyboard

Pocketop Portable Keyboard

The Pocketop Portable Keyboard is an infrared keyboard that works with any Palm OS handheld and most popular Pocket PC devices. The keyboard is designed to be as small as possible while still supporting touch typing.

October 22, 2002 by in Hardware

Gmate Yopy

Gmate Yopy

Gmate’s Yopy, which is being sold via the French Tuxmedia Web site, is attractive in terms of design but difficult to use due to lack of a backlight for the display. This clamshell-format, mini-keyboard-equipped device uses a Linux-based operating system, and offers an alternative to Palm OS and Microsoft’s Pocket PC.

October 17, 2002 by in Mobility

Norton Internet Security 2003

Norton Internet Security 2003

Keeping your PC safe from hackers and virus-writing cranks is simple with Norton Internet Security 2003 (NIS 2003). The software isn't free; so, if money's tight, the no-cost version of ZoneAlarm 3.0 remains your best bet. If you're willing to spend a few pounds, however, NIS 2003 will make it worth your while. Now with intelligent intrusion detection that sniffs out suspect data transmissions (the sneaky hack popularised by Nimda and Code Red), NIS 2003 protects you from backdoor break-ins. It has also added several other security and privacy tools, which let you, for instance, map the locale of hack attacks and stop pop-up ads. For £42.54 (ex. VAT; £49.98 inc. VAT), this firewall/virus-killer combo is the best deal around.

October 16, 2002 by in Security

Evesham Technology E-scape Li

Evesham Technology E-scape Li

The £250 PC hasn't been part of the British computing landscape since the days of the eight-bit micro. Evesham Technology has changed that, with the launch of the E-scape Li -- no monitor or speakers, but everything else you need for a working computer. It includes, for the first time in the UK market, a version of Linux aimed at the consumer.

October 11, 2002 by in Hardware

ViewSonic VG800

ViewSonic VG800

ViewSonic's VG800 is aimed at graphics professionals, but a lack of both physical positioning adjustment and digital inputs means it's probably better suited to less demanding users. Other features like the built-in speakers aren't of sufficient quality to add value.

October 10, 2002 by in Hardware

HP PSC 2210

HP PSC 2210

By definition, all multifunction devices (MFDs) print, copy and scan, and they often fax too. But only a handful, such as HP’s PSC 2210, also read memory cards from digital cameras, and very few manage to cram these abilities into a compact, easy-to-maintain unit. The PSC 2210 does all of the above, with performance that rivals that of standalone printers, both in speed and output quality. For a small office or a home requiring a convenient, space-saving unit, this is an excellent choice -- unless you intend to send a lot of faxes. In that case, you'd be better off with Canon's MultiPass F50, which has a sheet feeder that allows for speedy, multi-page faxes.

October 9, 2002 by in Printers

OmniPage Pro 12 Office

OmniPage Pro 12 Office

The twelfth version of ScanSoft's OmniPage Pro Office shows the competition just who's boss. Other optical character recognition (OCR) programs, such as Abbyy’s FineReader 6.0, can't quite keep up with OmniPage's simplicity and power. OmniPage can easily retain complex page layouts, for example, where other OCR applications cannot. What's more, OmniPage Pro is designed to help you publish converted information to paper, electronic files or even the Web. The program reads and writes PDFs and a long list of other formats, and it contains powerful network features that let you share scanners and install the program from a server. It's arguably the best OCR package available today, well suited to small and large businesses alike. However, if your budget can't spare £435 (ex. VAT), consider the slightly less accurate but much less expensive FineReader 6.0.

October 9, 2002 by in Developer

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All

Most Popular