S. Korea court awards wins to Samsung, Apple

S. Korea court awards wins to Samsung, Apple

Summary: [UPDATED] The court in Seoul rules that Apple had "infringed" two of Samsung's patents and will pay US$17,649 for each breach, while the Korean company violated one of Apple's and will pay US$22,000.

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TOPICS: Legal, Apple, Patents, Samsung
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A South Korean court has awarded Samsung Electronics a partial victory over rival Apple in the patent lawsuit it filed, saying the latter infringed on two of the Korean company's patents. In the counter-suit by Apple, it ruled in favor of Cupertino and Samsung will have to pay 25 million won (US$22,000) for violating one patent.

Yonhap News Agency reported on Friday the Seoul Central District Court had ruled that Apple "infringed two patent technologies of Samsung". As a result, Apple will have to pay damages of 20 million won (US$17,649) for each patent breach, it noted. 

The Wall Street Journal followed up with a separate report on Friday stating Samsung had violated one of Apple's patents and will have to pay the penalty of 25 million won. The patent in question is for Cupertino's bounce-back technology, which refers to when a user scrolls beyond the edge of a photo, Web page, or document, it bounces back into place, it explained. 

The court also banned sales of Apple's iPhone 4 and iPad 2 devices in the country, while sale of Samsung's Galaxy SII and Galaxy Nexus smartphones, as well as its Galaxy Tab and Galaxy 10.1 tablet devices will have to stop too, it noted.

Samsung's lawsuit was filed in September last year when it sought to ban sales of the yet-released iPhone 5 devices in the country. The patent battle in South Korea is but one of several raging in several countries currently as both companies jockey for position in the highly-competitive mobile industry.

Topics: Legal, Apple, Patents, Samsung

Kevin Kwang

About Kevin Kwang

A Singapore-based freelance IT writer, Kevin made the move from custom publishing focusing on travel and lifestyle to the ever-changing, jargon-filled world of IT and biz tech reporting, and considered this somewhat a leap of faith. Since then, he has covered a myriad of beats including security, mobile communications, and cloud computing.

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  • A more complete view

    The Wall Street Journal's story is a little different. It basically says that the court found that each company violated the other's patents, it awarded each of them damages that are hardly worth writing the checks for ($20,000), and banned products from both companies that are not the latest models from either company.

    My take is that the court is mindful that Kia and Hyundai are selling a lot of cars here, and they don't want any international incidents screwing that up.
    Robert Hahn
  • I had a feeling it would pan out like this

    With BOTH companies infringing upon the other's IP...
    athynz