Senate broadband hearing - NBN at what cost?

Senate broadband hearing - NBN at what cost?

Summary: Debate over the National Broadband Network is heating up. Is it economic? Do we want to avoid two major networks? What will be built? How will it be funded?

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Debate over the National Broadband Network is heating up. Is it economically feasible? Do we want to avoid two major networks? What will be built? How will it be funded? There are a lot of questions and, as you'll hear from the NBN's Mike Quigley, a lot of those questions still don't have answers.

The Senate Select Committee on the National Broadband Network started a series of 14 public hearings well before the April announcement on a fibre-to-the-node network. We covered a couple of them back in March on Twisted Wire.

This week we head back to Canberra to summarise the public hearing held by the Committee on 1 October. Surprisingly, there's some interesting discussion.

In a star-studded line up you'll hear from:

  • Richard Murray, Department of Treasury
  • Bernard Wonder, Productivity Commission
  • Peter Downey, Cables Downunder
  • Henry Ergas, economist
  • Anthony Doonan, YLess4U
  • Mike Quigley, NBN Co
  • Robin Eckermann, talking about Smart Grids
  • Simon Lewis, Department of Finance and Deregulation

Next week, the hearings from Melbourne (7 October) and Hobart (8 October).

Topics: Broadband, Government AU, Networking, NBN

About

Phil Dobbie has a wealth of radio and business experience. He started his career in commercial radio in the UK and, since coming to Australia in 1991, has held senior marketing and management roles with Telstra, OzEmail, the British Tourist Authority and other telecommunications, media, travel and advertising businesses.

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Talkback

14 comments
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  • Clear as mud

    Phil, it's all clear as mud. No wonder the proponents are spellbound and the Minister's modus operandi is, revolution instead of evolution, to achieve a successful outcome for this most important project that anyone, anywhere, had or will have the courage to undertake.

    People have been dispensing common sense since the saga began in earnest to no avail. It seems politicians have a way of doing things which conflicts with reason.

    A decade of nonsense, to keep you busy.

    Cheers
    anonymous
  • No shared fibre

    Mr Dobbie,

    We, as a nation, cannot afford to waste tens of billions of taxpayers dollars on a shared fibre (GPON) network, of which may max-out at 75mbps (if utilised at same time by all subscribers).

    If we're to construct a network that will last at least 50 years, then we must do it as a direct fibre (WDM-PON). Yes it would cost more, but its value would be far higher - thereby commanding a higher resale value by the government to pay-off the taxpayer funded debt.
    anonymous
  • re No shared fibre

    "If we're to construct a network that will last at least 50 years, then we must do it as a direct fibre (WDM-PON). Yes it would cost more, but its value would be far higher - thereby commanding a higher resale value by the government to pay-off the taxpayer funded debt."

    Who do you think will be conned into buying it second time around, especially from this crooked Government ? Certainly not at top dollar, that's for sure !
    anonymous
  • re re No

    you weren't conned you are making a fortune on your telstra shares, aren't you? ha
    anonymous
  • re re re No

    Perhaps not a fortune, but certainly more than you are, ha ! You're envy is priceless.
    anonymous
  • ha

    *you* said you were conned clown. now again your doing ok, get the story straight please!

    but if laughing at you and your losses makes me envious i am hugely envious, ha!
    anonymous
  • ha ha

    You're envy is priceless.
    anonymous
  • Ha ha indeed $3.12

    Your denials are laughable but pitiful.

    You were conned. No your making a fortune. No youre doing ok. No you were conned.

    $3.12 sorry can't stop laughing gotta go!!!
    anonymous
  • re Ha ha indeed $3.12

    Can easily see why you "can't stop laughing gotta go!!!"

    It's obviously time for you to return to the Asylum, before they realize you've managed to sneak out once again.
    anonymous
  • Telstra Deal

    The govt should buy telstra back. They could offer current shareholders to swap their Telstra shares for NBN shares, or give them a reasonable price.
    anonymous
  • no deal

    forgeting all the issue with fully privitising the nbn, what happens when they swap telstra shares for nbn and the nbn shares go down?

    the same people will again blame the government and demand they buy there nbn shares back.

    they need to face up to the fact *they* bought telstra and telstra have been no good and they have two options, hold and hope they will increase or sell and cut the losses.

    they can't expect the government to save there bacon.
    anonymous
  • deal

    I was thinking of it as a way for the govt to actually get their hands on the copper and get the thing built...hopefully without ripping off all those the previous govt convinced to buy the shares...
    anonymous
  • compromise?

    yeah cool in a way I spose.
    anonymous
  • re your no deal comment.

    "forgeting all the issue with fully privitising the nbn, what happens when they swap telstra shares for nbn and the nbn shares go down?"

    So in your mind, the NBN is going to be a failure. This highlights your lack of intelligence, and proves that all you ever want to do, is throw sh*t at anyone that owns Telstra shares, which certainly shows your true colours.
    anonymous