Six Clicks: Last year's most exciting crowdfunded tech devices

Six Clicks: Last year's most exciting crowdfunded tech devices

Summary: Need help getting your project or business off the ground? Here are some of the most interesting, exciting and innovative tech-related crowdfunding campaigns of the last 12 months.

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  • The Micro

    The Micro, crowdfunded on Kickstarter by M3D, is a project which captured the imagination of 3D printing enthusiasts looking for an affordable option directed at the consumer market.

    The Micro 3D printer, due to retail at $349 at launch, is a cube which measures in at 7.3" per side, and weights roughly 1kg. Usable with a Windows, Mac or Linux-based system and USB compatible, the mini 3D printer supports materials including nylon, ABS and PLA, as well as standard filament rolls. Custom software is used with the 3D printer to take away the complexity of using design blueprints.

    At the end of roughly a day, the crowdfunding campaign had raised over a million dollars. 

    Amount raised: $3,401,361

    Original goal: $50,000

    Via: Kickstarter

  • PowerUp 3.0, a smartphone controlled airplane

    The PowerUp 3.0, crowdfunded on Kickstarter, is a fun way to transform the paper airplane in to a smartphone-controlled toy. The user creates a paper airplane and then attaches a 'Smart Module' to the plane with clips. After launching the plane in to the sky, you control steering by opening the PowerUp app on your smartphone and then tilting your device or increasing/reducing throttle to go up or down. 

    If you're interested in buying the PowerUp 3.0, each one retails at poweruptoys.com for $49.99.

    Amount raised: $1,232,612

    Original goal: $50,000

    Via: Kickstarter

  • Ring : Shortcut Everything

    The Ring, crowdfunded on Kickstarter, is a 'wearable input device' which allows the wearer to control a number of gadgets, appliances and services. Once you slip the chunky silver ring on, touch sensors record gestures made on the hand, of which is sent to a connected smartphone application. For example, touching the side of the ring and checking the air could open a payment app -- before you draw the amount you want to pay for an item in the air and check again to show you're finished. The ring is pretty far in development, although has a long way to go before it finds solid application in tandem with our current devices. 

    Amount raised: $880,998

    Original goal: $250,000

    Via: Kickstarter

Topics: Emerging Tech, Mobility, Innovation

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  • rock paper scissors

    not quite sure about the paper airplane one, though I’m sure it might be fun for a few minutes. I think since they raised over 1mil and their goal was only 50k, they should put a camera on the tip to view or record.
    jyudzevich