Submarine cable makes FTTN link for Australia

Submarine cable makes FTTN link for Australia

Summary: Senator Stephen Conroy, Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy officially announced plans to build a 6,900km undersea cable between Guam and Sydney which will become one of the first links in the government's national FTTN network chain.

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Senator Stephen Conroy, Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy officially announced plans to build a 6,900km undersea cable between Guam and Sydney which will become one of the first links in the government's national fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) network chain.

Internet exchange vendor Pipe Networks announced today that it will be constructing the AU$200 million cable system known as the Pipe Pacific cable-1 (PPC-1), a two-pair fibre cable capable of delivering 1.92 terabits of data per second which is expected to become part of the foundations for the government's national FTTN network.

Construction of the cable is expected to be completed in mid to late 2009, and will subsequently link Australia to existing cable systems in Asia, the US and Europe through an exchange in Guam.

Senator Conroy expressed his support for the project at a press conference in Melbourne this morning, saying the cable will be an important piece of infrastructure for Australia's new network.

Bevan Slattery, managing director and CEO of Pipe, said in a statement that the cable is "vital to breaking the stranglehold the gang of four have on capacity into Australia".

Slattery described the bandwidth available in Australia for the past eight years as "overpriced" and announced Perth-based ISP iiNet had signed a 15-year international capacity deal with Pipe for access to the cable.

"This project signals the first entirely new cable delivered to Australia in eight years and will deliver more capacity for bandwidth-starved Australians," said iiNet CEO Michael Malone.

Malone said it is a common misconception that slow Internet speeds in Australia have been caused by the domestic networks themselves, ignoring problems with international links.

Topics: Broadband, Government, Government AU, Networking, Telcos, NBN

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7 comments
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  • Payless Internet

    Hopefully with this new initiative the ISP's in Perth would charge us much less than we are paying now. When compared to our Asian neighbours we are paying way too much.
    anonymous
  • asians

    unless you live in the tens of thousands to a square block, your not going to get prices as low as say singapore. Density matters. it makes it cheaper per user to hook up.
    anonymous
  • Finally!

    Somebody is talking some sense!

    "[I]t is a common misconception that slow Internet speeds in Australia have been caused by the domestic networks themselves"

    It's not much good having a 17Mbit ADSL2+ connection to your ISP if you can't even get 100KB to sites in the U.S.
    anonymous
  • Another one?

    Yeah great - just how many undersea cables do we need arriving in SYDNEY - so now we have to trunk Perth traffic over to Sydney still - how about a decent fibre to Africa from PERTH or a reasonable link out of NT? Guam??? -So where's the traffic go after Guam - onto the same Guam-US cables again? I hope someone has done their homework correctly before making this announcement.
    anonymous
  • East coast

    It's arriving in Sydney because most traffic from outside Australia is from the United States. PPC-1 will also have a potential spur to Brisbane. A link from Perth to Africa would be nice but how much traffic would originate from Africa? SEA-ME-WE-1 has a connection to Perth (from South East Asia / Middle East / Western Europe).
    anonymous
  • Traffic from Africa

    It'd ease the burden on the poor Nigerians trying to get their trust fund money back :p~
    anonymous
  • Excellent

    HA! I love the Aussie sense of humour. No way we can pipe that down a big cable.
    anonymous