Symbian show hints at future user interface

Symbian show hints at future user interface

Summary: Presentations at the Symbian Exchange and Exposition 2009, held this week in London, suggested how the future mobile OS might look

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TOPICS: Networking
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  • This week saw the Symbian Exchange and Exposition (SEE 2009) take place in London.

    The show was unusual in that the Symbian operating system, best known for being the powerhouse behind Nokia's smartphones, is currently being open-sourced and is therefore between two versions that will probably differ greatly.

    As much of the proprietary intellectual property in the old Symbian may not carry through to the new version, the Symbian-based phones that appear in 2010 may look very different from those that are available now.

    Lee Williams (pictured), chief executive of the Symbian Foundation, said at the event on Tuesday that the new Symbian would be "the world's most advanced OS" for mobile phones.

  • Near-field communications (NFC) is the short-range wireless technology that is currently most familiar through smartcards, such as London's Oyster travelcard.

    NFC allows devices to pair and transmit data through a simple swiping action. Phone manufacturers have long been keen on incorporating such functionality into their devices, in a bid to have handsets replace travelcards and debit cards.

    Nonetheless, Symbian's Lee Williams said at SEE that NFC had "the ability to truly form how mobile products and services interact with the world", and promised such functionality would be fundamental to the new Symbian platform.

Topic: Networking

David Meyer

About David Meyer

David Meyer is a freelance technology journalist. He fell into journalism when he realised his musical career wouldn't pay the bills. David's main focus is on communications, as well as internet technologies, regulation and mobile devices.

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  • Hmmm...

    "Phone manufacturers have long been keen on incorporating such functionality into their devices, in a bid to have handsets replace travelcards and debit cards."

    Incorporating in more flexibility to do things is good, but to replace others completely and make them dependent on a single device of such is bad real bad idea.
    CA-aba1d