Telstra gives HFC network 100Mbps boost

Telstra gives HFC network 100Mbps boost

Summary: Although the death knell has tolled for Telstra's hybrid fibre-coaxial (HFC) network with the signing of the $11 billion deal with the National Broadband Network Company (NBN Co), Telstra has committed to upgrading the network to provide speeds of 100 megabits per second by next month.

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TOPICS: Telcos, Telstra
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Although the death knell has tolled for Telstra's hybrid fibre-coaxial (HFC) network with the signing of the $11 billion deal with the National Broadband Network Company (NBN Co), Telstra has committed to upgrading the network to provide speeds of 100 megabits per second by next month.

Telstra today confirmed a report by iTNews that the company would follow up on its 2009 HFC upgrade to DOCSIS (data-over-cable service interface specification) 3.0 in Melbourne with upgrades in Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane, Perth and the Gold Coast by mid December.

"The December upgrade is Telstra's latest step to ensure its network delivers the high quality and reliability its customers expect," Telstra said in a statement. "Last financial year, the volume of data consumed over the average BigPond fixed internet connection more than doubled due to uptake of multiple internet-connected devices in homes, and growth in online media."

DOCSIS 3.0 allows for higher download speeds of up to 100Mbps through channel bonding, to provide extra capacity. 3.0 also provides support for IPv6, which Telstra began offering to enterprise, government and wholesale customers in September.

Although the company could not yet provide figures on the cost of the upgrade, the Melbourne overhaul in 2009 to approximately one million homes cost the telco $300 million. The price for consumers will be made available closer to the launch, Telstra said.

As part of its definitive agreement with NBN Co, Telstra will migrate broadband customers from the HFC network to the NBN over the next 10 years, as the NBN fibre rolls out to those areas. Telstra will keep the HFC in place, however, for cable television services.

While the telco giant was the first to upgrade its Melbourne HFC to DOCSIS3.0 in 2009, it lagged behind major rival Optus in Sydney and Brisbane, where Optus completed its upgrade in August last year.

Topics: Telcos, Telstra

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Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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7 comments
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  • Optus has cable, who knew?
    Try and find it on their website, go on, I'll wait here.
    bet you cant find it in 3 minutes.
    gikku-2ce6c
  • dear oh dear...
    Optus offers ADSL2+ and Cable.
    What is offered to you is depending on your 'serviceability' which means you may get cable or adsl depending where you live.
    There are not going to offer you a cable service and then realise its not available in your area?!?
    cootified
  • Why are they wasting their money? According to the opposition and anti-NBN brigade, nobody needs more than 12Mbit.
    gr1f
  • Indeed grif...

    It can only therefore be gathered (using thes people's intelligence...ahem) that Telstra are blatantly promoting piracy and p0rn, because they are the only people who need such speeds... LOL!

    What's funnier, the mouthy usual suspect, anti-NBNers/Political/Telstra puppets, who now frequent Delimiter... after previoulsy telling us "no one wants 100Mbps and the NBN will therefore go broke"... are now using Whirlpool comments to say Telstra 100Mbps will be swamped with customers...

    Their contradictory idiocy, is laughable...!
    Beta-9f71a
    • Beta,

      What about the home users that wish to access their home files from anywhere?
      Increased bandwidth also means increased uploads.

      The NBN will change the way software companies develop applications for home users, thus allowing the end user to fully exploit the capabilities of high speed internet.
      box_me2
  • Indeed box_me2...

    But it's impossible to convince those who, through their own financial and political selfishness, aren't interested in what's best for Australia and scoff.

    Nay, in fact, they are even more interested in trying dissuade people, by suggesting that progress has stopped and what we have will do, via whatever FUD they can conjure... sigh!
    Beta-9f71a
  • For what it is worth, note the recent kerfuffle over Mega Bills for smart phone users and it was pointed out that if they had home WiFi the downloads would have been on the wired network and they would have avoided those imposts ( some 30, 40 and even 50,000 ) One guy had a $129/month data account. Wirelss a better and more practical option, maybe for email and facebook users
    Abel Adamski