Trujillo amigo Lamming to return home

Trujillo amigo Lamming to return home

Summary: The leader of Telstra's ongoing IT transformation program, Trujillo amigo Tom Lamming, will return to his home country of the United States on 30 June, the telco revealed today.

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TOPICS: CXO, Telcos, Telstra
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The leader of Telstra's ongoing IT transformation program, Trujillo amigo Tom Lamming, will return to his home country of the United States on 30 June, the telco revealed today.

Tom Lamming
(Credit: Telstra)

Lamming's return to the US follows that of his fellow US colleagues, Greg Winn (also instrumental in Telstra's IT transformation program) who departed in January; former group managing director of Public Policy and Communications, Phil Burgess; and former group head of Marketing, Bill Stewart.

Lamming will be one of the last of the US executives appointed to a key position during the reign of Telstra's CEO Sol Trujillo, who was last week replaced by one-time managing director of IBM Australia and New Zealand and head of Telstra's Enterprise and Government division, David Thodey.

"This has been one of the most challenging but rewarding jobs that anyone could ever do," Lamming said in a statement today.

He has held several roles with Telstra; however, Lamming was first brought across as an advisor for its transformation program, announced in 2005. Lamming today admitted Telstra's IT transformation was the "the largest, most comprehensive and successful I have ever seen".

Following Fiona Balfour's resignation as Telstra's chief information officer (CIO) in 2007, Lamming temporarily took on the role until current CIO John McInerney overtook it last year. Since then Lamming has served in an oversight capacity as senior vice president, Transformation.

Lamming's early work within Telstra attracted a high degree of media attention due to the fact that his appointment had not been publicised, with several outlets claiming he had won a significant remuneration package for work he was completing from the US. However, Telstra later highlighted the importance of the executive's negotiations overseas with technology suppliers that would prove key to the transformation.

Today Lamming heaped praise on Trujillo, saying that "all successful transformations are driven from the top". The Telstra CEO returned the favour saying Lamming's vision for the transformation had resulted in Telstra's staff gaining a single view of its customers.

"Tom is one of those rare individuals with the foresight to understand what needs to be done and the commitment to turn the vision into a reality," said Trujillo. "As a result of Tom's world-class leadership and hard work, Telstra's transformed IT systems are operating at scale and providing a single, integrated view of customers."

Topics: CXO, Telcos, Telstra

Liam Tung

About Liam Tung

Liam Tung is an Australian business technology journalist living a few too many Swedish miles north of Stockholm for his liking. He gained a bachelors degree in economics and arts (cultural studies) at Sydney's Macquarie University, but hacked (without Norse or malicious code for that matter) his way into a career as an enterprise tech, security and telecommunications journalist with ZDNet Australia. These days Liam is a full time freelance technology journalist who writes for several publications.

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7 comments
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  • Robber Barons

    They can't leave fast enough - the Robber Barons are leaving the ship at pace with their money bags stuffed full.
    anonymous
  • Talk about dropping like flies

    Though I suppose it is winter! Maybe something good will come of Telstra once again like the old days when you'd make STD calls and think about Barbara Streisand singing 'Memories'.

    Or am I just being too nostalgic?
    anonymous
  • Robber Barons in Telstra

    How stupid are we REALLY as a Nation .. blind freddy could see years ago that all the 3 Amigo's did was stockpile their own big fat nests. The end result is clients also departing Telstra in droves because the service is poor , expensive by comparison , the internet grossly overpriced and under performing and they tried to hold the National Broadband debate to ransom for their own greedy selfish purposes. What we need are strategic thinkers and long term planners in it for the long haul who care about Australians and the telecommunications industry here not elsewhere .. good riddance to the Amigo's .
    anonymous
  • Robber Barons

    You bagged and abused them while they were here. Now you bag them for leaving ???
    anonymous
  • @Robber Barons

    It's typical. Probably the same crowd who scream Telstra are too expensive but would just as quickly scream anti-competitive, if they reduced their prices?
    anonymous
  • @@Robber Barons

    Yep, right on there mate ! But you'll never change the uneducated opinions of some anti Telstra people, and he's obviously one of them.
    anonymous
  • re Talk about dropping like flies

    You are just being nostalgic !
    anonymous