Utah residents will get to pay extra for NSA domestic spying

Utah residents will get to pay extra for NSA domestic spying

Summary: It looks like the state will subsidizing the NSA datacenter power bill

SHARE:

Back in May I told you about a large potential tax bill facing the new NSA datacenter in Utah. Well it looks like the NSA will get a pass on the tax as the Utah legislature looks to provide either a 6 year or permanent exemption to the new energy consumption tax.

According to a report in the Salt Lake Tribune, it seems that the previous Governor of Utah promised the tax exemption while courting the NSA to build their facility in Utah.

Amazingly enough, in light of the recent revelations about how much data the NSA has been collecting and how easily they can retrieve it, no one on either side (the NSA or the government) can find any record of the previous administration’s promise of a 6 year exemption from the tax. But regardless, the state government is going along with the offer.

At this point in time, no one knows when the 6 year exemption starts or if it will be made permanent. It’s up to the state legislature and so far, they aren’t talking about their plans. So in a bit of adding insult to injury, while we all pay the government so they can spend our money to spy on our activities, the good folks of Utah will be subsidizing that spying to the tune of $6 per person (at today’s power costs and current population) for as little as 6 years or potentially for the life of the facility.

Topics: Data Centers, Government US

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

5 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Dwindle

    States scramble to court companies by offering them low or no State taxes for long periods. In doing so, however, they drain their own treasuries of potential revenues. The net result is that they cannot build needed infrastructure and must to turn to the Federal government for help, or raise individual income or property taxes and fees to make up the shortfall. After all, a business cannot thrive on its own. It needs critical infrastructure like roads, bridges, electric power, sewage etc. More jobs mean more families coming to the state. And that means more schools are needed. These are all public goods, and they cost money.
    dsf3g
    • You May Have Not Noticed

      Where a Utah legislator mused about the necessity for public education. Now it's one person and I don't think being the nephew of famous Utah family singers will help sell the idea. Not that it would hurt.

      There will be a day, though, when a legislature will say it was a choice between attracting business and having public education. They will rationalize the unconscionable by saying that with those increased jobs, more people will afford private schools, in a thrilling example of 1 plus 1 plus campaign contributions equals cheese.
      DannyO_0x98
  • The tax exempt exemption will be made permanent

    Given all the information they have, I am sure they will be able to convince the legislatures to make the tax exemption permanent.
    Cain69
  • National Security

    "Amazingly enough, in light of the recent revelations about how much data the NSA has been collecting and how easily they can retrieve it, no one on either side (the NSA or the government) can find any record of the previous administration’s promise of a 6 year exemption from the tax."

    It's a "National Security" matter, so that conversation has been classified. :(
    lehnerus2000
  • watched some interviews

    From around that, and how all the locals are really happy it is there, talking about how much more work there is, how much more trade and so on. All the flow on benefits for the community and state..

    The money that is being spend is going right back into the economy, in wages and trade.
    Aussie_Troll