Vic makes smart grid cash grab

Vic makes smart grid cash grab

Summary: United Energy, Jemena, AGL Energy and Accenture have formed a consortium that hopes to make the city of Frankston in Victoria the national demonstration city for the Federal Government's $100 million in smart grid funding.

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in brief United Energy, Jemena, AGL Energy and Accenture have formed a consortium that hopes to see Frankston, Victoria, as the demonstration city for the Federal Government's $100 million smart grid pilot.

The idea of the funding was to create a pilot city in which to carry out trials to show how smarter, more aware energy networks can help Australians use less energy. The Federal Government released a tender for the pilot last October. The bid, headed by United Energy, is supported by the Victorian Government.

"Our bid sets out an integrated program for 10,000 households and businesses to use advanced technologies to understand their power usage, control their appliances and harness solar power, all aimed at reshaping the way power is delivered and used," United Energy CEO Gleeson said in a statement.

AGL Energy will implement the customer facing trials, while Accenture will be the integration partner. Delivery partner Jemena will install grid management technologies on the network in the Frankston area.

Topics: Government AU, Outsourcing

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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2 comments
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  • Don't be fooled

    Smart grids are more to do with saving costs and charging customers more for the same power than they are about environmental benefits.
    Any environmental benefit is more accidental than planned.
    anonymous
  • Demand shaping?

    I thought one of the main aims was to shape (ie. reduce) demand during peak periods. If you see the high price at that time you might turn off your big fat air conditioner etc.
    The old SECV used to build capacity into the grid before it was needed. Privatised companies have since soaked up this capacity without investing in the future.
    anonymous