Vodafone cuts price of wireless plans

Vodafone cuts price of wireless plans

Summary: Just a day after Optus said that it was reducing the quotas of its prepaid wireless plans, Vodafone has announced it is rolling back prices on its post-paid mobile broadband plans.

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Just a day after Optus said that it was reducing the quotas of its prepaid wireless plans, Vodafone has announced it is rolling back prices on its post-paid mobile broadband plans.

(Credit: Vodafone)

Vodafone said it would offer 5GB for $39.95 a month instead of $49.95 a month on a 24-month contract to new customers. It has also cut the price of its 1GB plan from $29.95 a month to $19.95 month. Previously, such pricing was only available to customers who had bundled mobile broadband with a mobile phone.

Those on the 5G plan receive Vodafone's USB internet stick modem free, while for customers on the 1GB plan, the stick costs $5 a month.

No Vodafone spokesperson was available to say if the pricing change was in direct response to Optus' prepaid quota reductions.

A Telstra spokesperson said that the company does not intend to change its prices, despite action in the area. "We don't compete on price anymore. It's all about the coverage we offer on the network."

There would be no changes to 3's mobile broadband prices according to a 3 spokesperson. "We've got competitive prices in comparison to those." However, the spokesperson said that 3 had reduced the price of buying its internet key modem outright from $149 to $129 last week.

In comparison, 3 Mobile offers 1GB for $15 per month with $5 for internet key modem if not buying outright, 2GB for $29 month, 3GB for $29 with $5 a month for the key modem, 6GB for $39 and 7GB for $49, with excess use charged at 10 cents per MB. Roaming usage outside the 3 broadband zone is charged at $1.65 per MB.

Topics: Broadband, Mobility, Networking, Telcos, Optus, Telstra, NBN

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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Talkback

10 comments
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  • Fair pricing.

    "A Telstra spokesperson said that the company does not intend to change its prices, despite action in the area. "We don't compete on price anymore. It's all about the coverage we offer on the network.""

    Bwaahaha - Okay, NextG is a good product but it is still stiflingly expensive like most of Telstra's products. The fact is that Telstra simply wants to profiteer with everything they sell and they boldly and unashamedly admit to it which shows that they are not only expensive but also arrogant.

    My hat goes off to Vodafone for their fair pricing.
    anonymous
  • 'we don't compete on price anymore'

    Well, that's very true. Telstra has never been able to compete on price.
    anonymous
  • not fair pricing, cheapest is best, according to you.

    isnt it funny how even a *good news story* about vodafone brings out the two headed, three fingered lunatics, who want to turn it into a telstra flogging session. at least mel, to his/her credit finished by saying hats off to vodafone.

    but when are you people going to grasp, theres more to it than just being the cheapest. havent you learnt from optuss latest little stunt. come in cheap then up the price. hello. gee i look forward to terria, haha.

    in your profession are you the cheapest? or are you a little more expensive because you believe you offer a little more in return? isnt that the way it is everywhere? think hyundai and maserati! i wonder?

    anyway, once again here's a take from a former telstra floggers, poster boy, who now has finally awoken to this very same subject, interesting.

    http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=1049901#r19

    bwaahaha indeed, woot.
    anonymous
  • there's always someone

    There's always someone who won't go with the flow, and continue the Telstra bashing...

    Sure, she mentioned vodafone, but it was all about the spin! She spun that so hard, that it makes the ending of Superman 1 incredibly possible.

    But she does have a point, Telstra never competes on price, and they do have good coverage. If you want anything from them, they'll make you bleed for it.

    It's good if you are cashed up in this day and age of doom and gloom.
    anonymous
  • Telstra CEO needs think..

    It would be nice if the Telstra CEO came down to earth and realised that rather than a handful of Next G network customers paying a damn fortune for the service - which isn't a service, only really a 'coverage'... I get no service! - perhaps maybe a slightly more 'competitive' price structure would attract a flood of customers in the door -regardless of service. There's no point in a gold plated coverage area with no customers using it because they can't afford it.

    Having a 150Mb plan for the iPhone at what could be considered half reasonable cost is only a starting point. I think that should be more like a 1Gb plan, then Telstra might be on a more level playing field.
    anonymous
  • Probably not on the right track either..

    Maybe the last comment had nothing to do with the story. It's close though and reflects customer opinion - whatever the data product. Good on Vodaphone and Optus for being more competitive.
    anonymous
  • ?

    "Good on Vodaphone and Optus for being more competitive."

    Umm.. Optus? They just reduced their quota's. Maybe good on Vodafone and 3 Mobile.
    anonymous
  • @?

    good point, seems the tttt will have to update that paragraph in their *how to/standard replies* section.
    anonymous
  • Ever stop to think?

    Ever stop to think at all that the price difference between Optus and NextG is all that extra hardware/handwidth that Telstra provide over Optus?

    Telstra know that if they continue to charge the prices that they do, that if they suddenly need to provision more hardware or backhaul to a congested tower, they can and still turn a profit.
    anonymous
  • What's real

    I don't understand: I took up a fixed term 5Gb/month contract with vodafone about 4 months ago for $39/month with free modem. I understood the free modem was a time limited offer.

    So it seems they are just back where they were 4-6 months ago. Yes, Telstra, from my experience, have a superior product, but these things are difficult to gauge??

    What is worrisome are the black holes, spurious outages and real throughput being well short of the mark. My question would be which telco(s) are going to be more transparent with saturation levels and the true capacity of the networks in areas that matter to the user. Its a moving target with mobile services.

    It is an ongoing problem trying to rate these services with less than half the real picture. Its just not apples to apples.
    anonymous