Apple, Google and Amazon top 'Most Admired' list

Apple, Google and Amazon top 'Most Admired' list

Summary: Technology companies dominate Fortune magazine's annual list of the World's Most Admired Companies, which will be published in the issue for 19 March 2012. Apple has taken first place for the fifth year in a row, followed by Google, Amazon.

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TOPICS: Tech Industry
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Technology companies dominate Fortune magazine's annual list of the World's Most Admired Companies, which will be published in the issue for 19 March 2012. Apple has taken first place for the fifth year in a row, followed by Google, Amazon.com, Coca-Cola and IBM. That means technology companies took four places in the top five.

Other technology companies in the Top 50 include Microsoft (17th), Samsung (34th), Intel (36th), eBay (4st), Cisco (42nd), AT&T (46th) and Oracle (49th). Neither HP nor Dell nor Yahoo made the cut, though Starbucks, McDonald's, and Wal-Mart did.

The results are based on a Fortune survey conducted by the Hay Group. It asked 3,855 executives, directors, and securities analysts to select the 10 companies they admired most from a long list. Anyone could vote for any company in any industry.

The criteria included financial soundness, competitiveness, innovation, people management and social responsibility. However, for those surveyed, recent business success appears to count for more than anything else. For example, there is no sign of a backlash against Apple's well-publicised problems with working conditions (and worker suicides) in its Chinese factories, operated by Foxconn. However, this was not due to ignorance, because Hon Hai, which trades as Foxconn, took the bottom place as the Least Admired company for Social Responsibility.

In the European results, car companies scored best. The Top 5 was made up of BMW, Nestle, Volkswagen, Siemens and Daimler. However, SAP (13th) and Nokia (30th) also made the Top 50

In the Asia/Pacific region, the Top 5 comprised Toyota, Canon, Samsung Electronics, Sony and Honda: four Japanese companies out of five. However, Huawei, China Mobile and LG Electronics made the top 10, and Lenovo (12th), TSMC (20th), Acer (37th), and Hon Hai (41st) also made the Top 50. (TSMC is Taiwan Semiconductor.)

Whether all this means very much is another matter. However, there's a strong element of sentiment in share prices, and appearing high on the list cannot be considered harmful. It must also help attract staff, who will generally prefer to work for a company that is widely admired.

@jackschofield

Topic: Tech Industry

Jack Schofield

About Jack Schofield

Jack Schofield spent the 1970s editing photography magazines before becoming editor of an early UK computer magazine, Practical Computing. In 1983, he started writing a weekly computer column for the Guardian, and joined the staff to launch the newspaper's weekly computer supplement in 1985. This section launched the Guardian’s first website and, in 2001, its first real blog. When the printed section was dropped after 25 years and a couple of reincarnations, he felt it was a time for a change....

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  • Interesting article Jack, I expected to see Cisco a little higher than 42nd...they have cetainly dropped.

    Cisco London 2012
    qardoo
  • @qardoo

    There's a lot of the herd aspect to the behaviour of both technology fan boys (particularly the iSheep) and the press. We build them up; we knock them down. Being thoughtful, sensible, rational, moderate etc doesn't get you any attention at all....

    Also, Cisco's dabbling in home products (set top boxes, Linksys, Flip video) doesn't look that good in retrospect. It's probably fair to say that John Chambers hasn't always walked on water ;-)
    Jack Schofield