Dropbox for Business meets another global cloud security standard

The cloud company announced on Monday it has been granted ISO 27018 certification, the world's first international standard for cloud privacy and data protection.

Dropbox for Business has jumped over another hurdle as it aims to garner more professional clientele with sensitive and valuable data.

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The San Francisco-based business announced on Monday it has been granted ISO 27018 certification, the world's first international standard for cloud privacy and data protection.

First introduced in August 2014, ISO 27018 was written specifically to address user privacy. It came about an upgrade from ISO 27001, a global information security standard.

Tolga Erbay, a manager for Dropbox's security risk and compliance team, elaborated further in a blog post that the certification also outlines how Dropbox can and cannot use a customer's information for its own purposes.

That includes being "transparent" about where customer data resides on Dropbox servers, what happens when files are deleted, and other companies with which Dropbox decides to partner and integrate.

"We only use the personal information you give us to provide you the services you signed up for," Erbay wrote. "You can add, modify, or delete data from Dropbox when you need to."

Dropbox also committed to annual audits by an independent third party to confirm it stays in line with both the ISO 27018 and ISO 27001 certifications.

The file sharing service follows in the footsteps of Microsoft, which has arguably put all things cloud at the top of its agenda this year. The Windows maker adopted the new global accreditation in February.

Dropbox for Business has been making its international ambitions more well known over the last several months.

Most recently in April, Dropbox started plotting an expansion in to Japan thanks to a new partnership forged with SoftBank. The cloud storage provider aims to garner at least one million business users in Japan over the next five years.

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