Twitter finally fills vacant CFO position

Former Goldman Sachs investment banker Ned Segal takes over the CFO role from Anthony Noto, who was promoted to COO last November.

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Twitter has named former Goldman Sachs investment banker Ned Segal as its new CFO, a role that's been vacant since Anthony Noto -- himself a former Goldman Sachs analyst -- was promoted to chief operating officer last November.

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In a tweet, Segal said he was excited to join Twitter's leadership ranks and support the microblogging site's "important mission and tremendous potential."

Segal began his professional career at Goldman Sachs and held various positions throughout the investment firm until leaving in 2013. His most recent position was with financial software firm Intuit as its SVP of finance.

"Ned's experience in financial operations as a public company and business unit CFO, along with his background serving technology companies and investors, are an ideal fit for Twitter as we work to extend our positive momentum, continue growing our audience and achieve greater operating efficiency," said Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, in a press release.

In a regulatory filing, Twitter revealed that Segal will receive a base salary of $500,000 plus sign-on bonus of $300,000. On top of that, Segal will also get nearly 800,000 shares of Twitter stock vesting over four years.

Twitter's leadership team has seen multiple high-level changes over the last few years. Former COO Adam Bain, the person largely credited with scaling Twitter's lucrative ad business, left Twitter in late 2016 after six years with the company. Bain had been appointed COO around the time Jack Dorsey regained his role as chief executive.

Before Bain took over, the position had been vacant for more than a year following the departure of Ali Rowghani, who left amid a previous executive shuffle stemming from issues with lackluster growth and product innovation -- a struggle that still plagues Twitter to this day.

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