IDF: Will your device really get to know you?

IDF: Will your device really get to know you?

Summary: The Intel Developer Forum kicks off Tuesday and the company has started with a few "day 0" presentations--including one on research on how mobile devices that can sense and adapt to you--that are worth a look.Intel released three presentations and the most interesting one--and potentially problematic--comes from Mary Smiley, director of Intel's emerging platforms labs.

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The Intel Developer Forum kicks off Tuesday and the company has started with a few "day 0" presentations--including one on research on how mobile devices that can sense and adapt to you--that are worth a look.

Intel released three presentations and the most interesting one--and potentially problematic--comes from Mary Smiley, director of Intel's emerging platforms labs. The general concept goes like this: Mobile devices will learn you, know what situation you're in, gauge the environment and infer what you need. Smiley's primary example looked out how these smart devices would apply to the health care industry.

Here's the prototype use case:

idf1.png

All of those sensors may have a big health care benefit, but you could argue that it also has "nag" written all over it. Devices will tell you you're too fat, shouldn't eat that steak and need to exercise more. I have a lot of rugby and offensive line pals that may just throw this "proactive wellness" prototype out the window (or worse). Luckily, my girthy pals don't have to worry about this scenario anytime soon--there's a lot of architecture work ahead.

Here's a look at the moving parts for these pervasive sensor-driven devices of the future. This architecture could have ramifications for everything from social networking to wellness to mobile augmented reality.

idf2.png

Aside from the chips, which Intel will be happy to sell you, a lot of these parts above aren't quite there. These devices of the future will anticipate what you need an act appropriately. A device will know what you like, what you're up to, where you are and how you're feeling. It'll also know you're surroundings. Here's the architecture overview:

idf3.png

First thought: What happens when your personal aggregator is hacked? And what's the personal data warehousing app going to look like? After all, something has to crunch all the data from sensor nodes. Smiley's presentation raises all the issues. What does this device sense, how do you crunch information and what are the privacy implications?

The presentation raises a lot of big thoughts and these devices may not be all that far off. I'm not sure whether to worry about these new devices or look forward to them.

Topics: Health, CXO, Enterprise Software, Intel, Mobility, Software, IT Employment

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7 comments
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  • Personal devices

    You will receive a discount on health insurance, or maybe a chance to keep you job, when you wear the device and provide the information to the insurance carrier.
    Uncle Caleb
    • When you're going to die ? No thanks !

      I guess no one will want this, why? Imagine the day (and will coming) where you'll see a LCD text saying: "You're going to die in nn days.". No thanks. I'll pass!
      Gradius2
  • RE: IDF: Will your device really get to know you?

    I'm 50. I joined the Royal Navy at 16. I've always carried some kind of I.D... Since leaving the Navy at 30, i've been in I.T. Guess what...
    I wear more I.D. than I did in the services.

    Lets get this damn thing sorted out... Skin chip
    I.D, no problem. Health monitoring, no problem.

    It will happen one day. Hopefully before I cash in, so I can get rid of all the stupid badges on my belt!

    Eli.
    Elihion
  • RE: IDF: Will your device really get to know you?

    I cant say, But Its nice to know when I will
    die, because you make acctionds befor its to
    late :)
    wolfje
  • RE: IDF: Will your device really get to know you?

    Im into IT as much as the next guy, but look, unlike, if you want to develope devices that can assist medical teams, fine, do that. But if you sell this crap to the insurance companies, it will give them too much power over our lives. What if health care depends on whatever outcome these devices say we have or don't have, and it's the wrong diagnoses. This may sound paranoid, but I fear the day when we no longer have a choice whether or not we want to have these devices hooked up to us in the name of security, our health, or any other such agenda. I can think of other areas this could benefit such as security of shipments into our ports, or more intelegent troubleshooting for aircraft or space systems.
    gwzap2008
    • In the name of security

      In the current milieu, virtually anything is accepted in the name of security. Once one is tagged with a secure id, many things become possible. Not only changes in medical processing, but also financial processes.

      Imagine a time when, because of your secure id, that your taxes are automatically calculated. They include calculation of sales tax from every purchase you have made because it was tagged from your secure id. Wouldn't that be easier? :-)

      Just because it can be done does not mean that it should be done. All things are lawful, not all things are helpful.
      Uncle Caleb
  • how to hack yourself an ensurance policy...

    The company is hiding in the clouds...
    emenau