OSBC: enterprise applications next wave for open source

OSBC: enterprise applications next wave for open source

Summary: This morning kicked off the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco, where a mixed crowd of IT enterprise customers and vendors, lawyers, and venture capitalists rubbed elbows as they contemplated open source market strategies. In his keynote, Larry Augustin, CEO of Medsphere, left everyone with no doubt that the next frontier for open source software development is the applications space.

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TOPICS: Open Source
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This morning kicked off the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco, where a mixed crowd of IT enterprise customers and vendors, lawyers, and venture capitalists rubbed elbows as they contemplated open source market strategies.

In his keynote, Larry Augustin, CEO of Medsphere, left everyone with no doubt that the next frontier for open source software development is the applications space. Augustin talked about four successful models, each representing a different application category: sugarCRM, Compiere, Asterisk, and VistA (the technology his company first deployed to the private sector) and looked at what they had in common to come up with six rules that identify a ripe opportunity for open source: (1) Look at heavy applications that are traditionally a big expense and take years to implement. These include, CRM, ERP, PBX, and EHR (electronic health records). (2) The presence of big proprietary traditional competitors with big upfront software licensing fees that make it hard to get started. (3) A large, enthusiastic free user base so you don't have to spend a lot of time educating them and the market about what you are doing, giving you sales leverage. (4) An enthusiastic developer ecosystem--you have a community of people that participate in some way. (5) There is a big enterprise market opportunity: for healthcare, the market is to grow to $25B IT market by 2007. (6) You have a big under-penetrated SMB market opportunity.

Augustin then gave two drivers for the next wave of open source. The first is developer interest. He said that applications give fodder for the next generation of developers looking for a new challenge. "They're not going to build Linux again," he said. The second reason is that the traditional enterprise software model is broken (long sales cycles, expensive, inaccessible to SMBs, etc.).

Topic: Open Source

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  • Enterprise open source technology adoption

    If a CIO/CTO is in the process of comparing OSS to commercial software, the mere fact that other institutions/offices have had success with a technology might act as a testimonial that OSS is a valid way to go.

    As an institution looking to consider deploy open source technology, we brought in an independent, technology neutral consulting firm - Advent Consulting, based in Cambridge MA, to provide an overall assessment and validate the technology requirements.

    One key factor we considered using Advent, is that they also participate and contribute to various open source projects, which helped us better understand the direction on the open source technology we are interested in.
    bmeager
  • Which is exactly why ....

    I have spent months developing my S-lang based project called "SLANG" (for what S-lang is visit
    http://www.s-lang.org ).

    If you liked Foxpro/Delphi/Clarion/FileMaker/Access,
    your gonna love SLAG.

    SLAG is a way to write Business Applications that are "STACK" driven, mouseable, TUI interface that looks and acts like a GUI, but can be run, without modifcations on even dumb terminals!

    And yes, I might have a way yet to still go, the results of what I have already accomplished, are truly amazing....
    Linux_4u!
  • ISVs on deathrow

    I also saw Larry?s presentation and it was very good. The question is who will really get under pressure? The big guys? Siebel? SAP? Sure! But they sit on tons of $$$ and have huge services businesses already operating anyway. The business on deathrow are the ACTs and Quickens. We will see at least one open source alternative for each commercial business software package. And it will happen soon.

    Tim, Humano2.com - Open Enterprise Applications
    edbong