Judge denies DoJ access to searches

Judge denies DoJ access to searches

Summary: Judge James Ware has granted the DoJ access to 50,000 URLs from Google's database, but denied access to any search queries according to an official statement from Google on their blog.  Originally the subpoena requested that Google provide billions of URLs and two months of search queries performed by its users.

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TOPICS: Google
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Judge James Ware has granted the DoJ access to 50,000 URLs from Google's database, but denied access to any search queries according to an official statement from Google on their blog.  Originally the subpoena requested that Google provide billions of URLs and two months of search queries performed by its users.

The government's original request demanded billions of URLs and two month's worth of users' search queries. Google resisted the subpoena, prompting the judge's order today. In addition to excluding search queries from the subpoena, Judge James Ware also required the government to limit its demand for URLs to 50,000. We will fully comply with the judge's order.

Here is an excerpt from the official ruling

  1. In the development or implementation of the protocol, Google shall not be required to disclose proprietary information with respect to its database;

  2. The Government shall pay the reasonable cost incurred by Googel in the formulation and implementation of the extraction protocol;

  3. Any information disclosed in response to this order shall be subject to the protective order in the underlaying case;


To the extent the motion seeks an order compelling Google to disclose search queries of its users the motion is DENIED.  The Court retains jurisdiction to enforce this Order.

Topic: Google

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  • DOJ Hard Luck

    The DOJ could have put a few words into Google search and probably have gotten more than 50K URL's
    karson_morrison9
    • Yep!!

      You said it!! Questions...How much did this Google "search" cost us as taxpayers?...Why did other search engines give out this information when they all could have gone to court with Google? So many questions, so little time. Go fig.
      jamesgrimes9