Microsoft's new North Star: 6 things that have to go right

Microsoft's new North Star: 6 things that have to go right

Summary: The Microsoft reorg is a bit complicated, but the overall aim is to be more agile. For now it's unclear whether Microsoft can truly harness the power of one. Here are the hurdles Microsoft will have to clear.

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Microsoft reorganized, outlined a strategy that revolves around services and noted that it will be a company unified behind enabling the important personal and work tasks in your life. Microsoft's North Star is ambitious, but a lot of things have to go right to actually execute.

The Microsoft reorg is a bit complicated, but the overall aim is to be more agile. For now it's unclear whether Microsoft can truly harness the power of one.

More: Microsoft 3.0: A meaner, leaner devices and services machine? | CEO Ballmer's reorg mail to the troops: 'One Microsoft all the time' | Microsoft re-organisation: From devices to big data, what it means for business

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Can Microsoft really integrate these disparate products, create one experience, navigate management dotted lines and become nimble? We'll see.

 

Here's a look excerpts from CEO Steve Ballmer's memo to the troops and what has to happen for Microsoft to actually deliver.

 

We will strive for a single experience for everything in a person’s life that matters. One experience, one company, one set of learnings, one set of apps, and one personal library of entertainment, photos and information everywhere. One store for everything. Microsoft has the clear opportunity to offer consumers a unified experience across all aspects of their life, whether the screen is a small wearable, a phone, a tablet, an 85-inch display or other screens and devices we have not yet even imagined.

What has to go right? First, consumers have to decide they really want a single experience. Apple has proven integration with hardware and software works, but the proposition gets trickier as cloud services enter the picture. Google is also well positioned. The biggest wild card is that consumers---not enterprises---have to pick Microsoft's experience to cover work and personal life.

Look at our tremendous assets. We have a super-intelligent cloud that understands people and can solve problems for them. We have a platform that is adaptable to every screen — big, small, mobile, institutional, personal and even wearable — and is defined by a set of universal services that meet people’s needs at home, work and school. We have a gaming and home entertainment platform second to none. We excel not only at the things people do most often but also by what matters the most to them. Our platform, services and apps are not limited just to activities in people’s personal lives but also span their professional lives. We have focused not only on what matters most to individuals but also on what’s vital to businesses around the globe, IT managers and developers.

In the critical choice today of digital ecosystems, Microsoft has an unmatched advantage in work and productivity experiences, and has a unique ability to drive unified services for everything from tasks and documents to entertainment, games and communications.

What has to go right? Microsoft needs to execute on its restructuring and break down silos. CEO Steve Ballmer can talk about the power of one, but delivering on these integrated experiences is another matter entirely.

The bedrock of our new strategy is innovation in deep, rich, high-value experiences and activities. It’s the starting point for differentiated devices integrated with services. It’s at the core of how we will inspire ourselves all to do our best work and bring to our customers the very things that will make a difference in their lives...Such high-value activities include the full breadth and depth of areas like personal expression, decision-making and tasks, social communication, and serious fun — and we have both the drive and the capacity to reinvent these experiences for people across the globe.

What has to go right? Tech buyers of all stripes need to see Microsoft as a work and play company. For its part, Microsoft has to show it can do casual technology and also use it for "more important tasks."

No technology company has as yet delivered a definitive family of devices useful all day for work and for play, connected with every bit of a person’s information available through one cloud. We see tremendous room for innovation in software, services and hardware to bring the consumer this new, more complete and enveloping experience.

Our family will include a full spectrum of both partner and first-party devices. We believe we need all of these categories to drive innovation, fulfill market desire for diversity of experience, and achieve volume.

What has to go right? Microsoft has to navigate the balance partner devices and the herding cats problem with its own hardware like Surface. So far, no one in Microsoft's army has come up with the killer form factor and hybrid device.

We will continue to reinvent the core “shell” of our family of devices and build upon what we have started with Windows 8. We will keep evolving our new modern look, expanding the shell so that it allows people and their devices to capture, store and organize their “stuff” in new ways. Our UI will be deeply personalized, based on the advanced, almost magical, intelligence in our cloud that learns more and more over time about people and the world. Our shell will natively support all of our essential services, and will be great at responding seamlessly to what people ask for, and even anticipating what they need before they ask for it.

What has to go right? Microsoft needs Windows 8 and its user interface to take root. Microsoft also has to keep its core shell from becoming too bloated.

Our new strategy will put us right at the intersection of the consumerization of IT and the evolving needs of the enterprise customer, delivering the devices that employees want and the productivity, security and control that IT managers need.

Ballmer talked enterprise and consumerization. He said the plan is to "facilitate adoption of our devices and end-user services in enterprise settings."

This means embracing consumerization of IT with the vigor we pursued in the initial adoption of PCs by end users and business in the ’90s. Our family of devices must allow people to be more productive, and for them to easily use our devices for work.

What has to go right? Consumers need to adopt Windows 8-based devices---PCs, tablets and smartphones and bring them to work. Consumerization needs consumer buy-in to work. So far, Windows 8 and Windows Phone have failed to cause a consumer groundswell.

Topics: Microsoft, Cloud, Enterprise Software, Bring Your Own Device

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15 comments
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  • Copy Apple at all cost

    Anyone could be CEO of Microsoft. Just watch what Apple does and do that.
    Marzell
    • Under Ballmer's Watch . . .

      . . . Microsoft has gone from being the richest, most influential and most powerful technology company in the world, to a necessary evil in business and a joke in the consumer space. The sheer number of poor decisions and confusing products seems to be growing at an exponential rate.

      The only hope for this initiative to achieve some level of success is if Ballmer is removed. Until that day comes, Microsoft will continue down the path of irrelevancy. . .
      Gr8Music
  • Copy Apple at all cost

    Anyone could be CEO of Microsoft. Just watch what Apple does and do that.
    Marzell
    • if ...

      ... Apple had more than 4 products that made serious revenue, your (snide) comment may carry weight. Until then, I think it safe to say that Microsoft's vast product range necessitates a far more complex business than most which requires a far more complex management structure.
      bitcrazed
      • Pipe dreams

        Microsoft has promised a lot of stuff and delivered none of it. For so many years. I believe those who blindly believe them are just ... newcomers.

        The computer world has always been heterogenous and no praying by Microsoft can change that fact.
        danbi
      • If...

        Might be they need to first understand why Apple do not make any imaginable junk.
        danbi
      • M$ has copied so many products and flopped most of them.

        Any other company with less money to burn would have gone out of business with as many failed attempts to copy other products.

        I have used Windows phone/mobile 6.x versions and they were terrible, I have never seen a Windows 7 phone, and I have never seen a Windows 8 anything.

        No one I know uses Bing (or its previous 4 names.) I use Google to find things on M$'s own website. It is much faster and more accurate.

        What was the point of MSNBC, (to compete with MSN? Why?)

        How many music services has M$ had? 2 that I am aware of, (and one of them was discontinued a few years back so you cannot put the music you bought on a new computer because there is no server to validate your DRM.)

        You can listen to all that music on your Zune. (Zune who?)

        Sure, the XBox worked out, but after they threw how much money at it? It took years of throwing good money after bad to get where they are now.

        M$ needs to do less things, and do them better!
        mlashinsky
        • Opps, made a mistake, If only I had an edit button...

          I didn't mean MSN, I meant CNN.
          mlashinsky
  • So, where do the de facto spies fit in this reorg?

    As in, the fine folk responsible for making sure any/all Microsoft users can have their data hoovered by the government of the US of A.
    ego.sum.stig
    • So, where do the de facto spies fit in this reorg?

      In the shadows.
      DancesWithTrolls
  • Clarity of thoght and purpose

    Window 8 is a game changer even for MSFT. The role of personal computers has changed and evolved to the point where it will impact on every phase of our lives. Congruence has already taken place with Win8 and Xbox one being part of the foundation. This reorg is MSFT stepping into the future.
    primartcloud
    • They are way late recognizing it then.

      Everybody else already shifted focus.
      jessepollard
  • Collaboration vs Agility

    The most unrealistic aspect of this reorganization "vision" is the fact that Ballmer expects people to collaborate more and become more agile at the same time. Collaboration means extra communication overhead, which slows down teams. This is the opposite of becoming more agile. It's like putting a ball and chain on the ankle of an Olympic runner then telling him/her to go win a gold medal.

    This "one experience" focus is risky, too. The question is, do people really want one experience? Putting one experience on devices with widely varying capabilities dictates a lowest common denominator approach. The limitations of the weakest platform limit the utilization of the strongest. This fact is glaringly obvious when comparing Metro on a phone, which works well, versus Metro on a desktop, which doesn't.

    The strength of one is a misguided delusion. Remember the old adage about putting all of your eggs in one basket? One experience isn't the best idea when that experience sucks on half of the platforms you support. I hope their new agility helps them recover from this major blunder.

    In a nutshell, I don't see a bright future for Microsoft, if they continue down this path. One size never fits all.
    BillDem
    • Collaboration vs Agility - a false choice

      "The most unrealistic aspect of this reorganization "vision" is the fact that Ballmer expects people to collaborate more and become more agile at the same time. Collaboration means extra communication overhead, which slows down teams. This is the opposite of becoming more agile. It's like putting a ball and chain on the ankle of an Olympic runner then telling him/her to go win a gold medal."

      Not sure where you are coming from. Agile is all about collaboration & tight feedback loops. Yes, there is "extra" overhead - as with anything. But one should look at cost-benefit, not just cost. And when tracking metrics for continuously improvement, Lean advocates measuring the overall system - not just making simple, local optimizations (Greedy Algorithm).

      I do agree though that MS is likely not going to become Agile.

      -Johnny
      4johnny
      • No, I think Bill had it exactly right.

        M$ is a lumbering giant. It cannot get out of its own way, much less change direction quickly or well, (or at all?) I have been saying for years that many M$ products look like they were designed by committees, (cough- Vista -cough...) The only thing committees do is compromise and fail to satisfy anyone. So much for all that collaboration...

        M$ designed Win 8 to be one interface on many different devices, devices with very different uses. As I see it, M$ now has 5 devices running 5 different OSs, with one interface. (8 32 bit, 8 64 bit, RT, Phone, and XBox.) I think they would have been better off if they had one OS, and a different UI for each device. Then you could load Office on your RT or phone, or your new game on your PC. That would be "One". What they have is exactly what Bill described: All different, and all brought down to the lowest common denominator.

        When Vista came out, I predicted that one day, we would all be sitting around, (with pants pulled up to our chests,) and reminisce about how Vista was the beginning of the end for Microsoft. (Remember that Vista debacle? What were they thinkin'?) M$ is a really big company. It will not fail overnight, but Balmer is doing his best to kill it.
        mlashinsky