Telstra finds wholesale chief

Telstra finds wholesale chief

Summary: Telstra announced today that it had appointed a new group managing director to head up its wholesale division.

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Telstra announced today that it had appointed a new group managing director to head up its wholesale division.

Nerida Caesar (Credit: Telstra)

Nerida Caesar, currently executive director, national sales within Telstra's enterprise and government division, has nabbed the position which had previously been held by Kate McKenzie.

It had been necessary to find a replacement for McKenzie after she was appointed to group managing director, strategic marketing last week, filling the whole left by Bill Stewart who announced his departure earlier this month.

Caesar's appointment is affective 30 March. She joined Telstra in 2006 as executive director of customer management teams. Before starting with the telco, Caesar spent 20 years with IBM, rising to become vice president of IBM Asia-Pacific's Intel Server division.

Caesar said she valued wholesale as a role. "Telstra Wholesale is one of the most exciting and issues-rich parts of the company, and I am very excited to have the opportunity to lead the division at an important time in its history," she said in a statement.

Telstra CEO Sol Trujillo voiced his belief that Caesar's current role, where she is responsible for the relationships with Telstra's biggest enterprise and government customers was "perfect preparation" for the wholesale role.

"Nerida's promotion to GMD of Telstra wholesale is a natural progression for someone who has displayed leadership and vision while consistently delivering results in her sales role with Telstra's biggest customers," he said in a statement.

Topics: Telcos, Telstra, IT Employment

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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Talkback

8 comments
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  • Wholesale or Splitsale?

    Any appointments made by the outgoing C.E.O should be watched with great care. His incompetency and destruction of Australia's largest telecommunications company may see this appointment to be a very short stint as mounting speculation rides that the federal government will deem the company under Mr McGauchie and Mr Trujillo's leadership as a failed private venture which in turn will see heaver protected government regulation and control that will serve in the best interests of the shareholders, staff and customers. Oh, what a win-win that would be for everybody. Fingers crossed.
    anonymous
  • FIGHT UNTO THE END. Death or Liberty.

    Actually, regardless of what happens Telstra's executive will be applauded for resisting the moves by others that are trying to drive Telstra to destruction at the expense of the shareholders that paid for the assets of Telstra from the govt. Those sly subversive forces who act SOLELY FOR THEIR OWN INTEREST. very very far from the pretense that is the consumer benefit. It is already obviously immoral and should be criminal what Telstra shareholders have had to endure considering they have not made a profit on their shares for 10 years of ownership.
    anonymous
  • Wholesale/splitsale

    The only immoral action I can see was the sale of Telstra without structural separation of the then, existing infrastructure. Providing a monopoly to a private company was immoral and bad public policy. The greedy, self-serving monopolists (Telstra shareholders) who sought to take advantage of this appalling decision deserve all they get!
    anonymous
  • Re Wholesale/splitsale

    If you have super, you are probably one of these greedy, self-serving monopolists yourself, and yes, you do deserve all you do or do not get.
    anonymous
  • FIGHT UNTO THE END. Death or Liberty.

    I wonder how the Telstra bashers would feel, if the tax paying shareholders, who bought in after the previous Government sold them heavily on the idea of buying into Telstra in the first place, were able to recoup some of their losses from the Government of today. (An example would have to be this Government's guaranteed bank funds, would it not ?)
    anonymous
  • Re Wholesale/splitsale

    You are spot on there, but I'm sure the person you answered would not understand that. Fair dinkum, the input from most of these anti Telstra sods are unbelievable. (It's like, why should Telstra have shareholders that are simply looking for a reasonable return on their investment - how dare they !) And yet if the banks or some overseas owned companies make huge profits, it is not a problem. It certainly has me beat.
    anonymous
  • Splitsale/wholesale

    Ahhh, Death or Liberty; you have made a bad investment decision if you didn't understand the politics of the sale of state monopolies in a regulated (competition policy anyone?) market. As I said, it was bad public policy that appealed to those who sought to take advantage of a monopoly. The financial crisis and it's consequences is another matter altogether. By the way, Telstra do some good stuff but they also deserve a bit of bashing.
    anonymous
  • Splitsale/wholesale

    Two bad investment decisions actually. One was to have trust in the Howard Government, and the other was to have trust in the Rudd Government. Anything Government owned, or part Government owned is a no-no, where investment is involved, as you never know which bureaucrat might at times be pulling the purse strings, or having an effect on the outcome !
    anonymous