Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet, covering cybersecurity, national security, policy and privacy. He is based out of the New York newsroom, and can also be found on sister sites CNET and CBS News. You can contact him with his PGP key: EB6CEEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

Predictions for JavaOne, anyone?

Predictions for JavaOne, anyone?

I just got done reading Sun president and COO Jonathan Schwartz's most recent blog entry, most of which describes the business model that put Red Hat on the map with Linux -- but that does so in the context of Sun's recently released OpenSolaris and how, by crossing the digital divide, all technology boats will float a little higher.  Wrote Schwartz, "And I'd rather get 20% of a business that's planetary in scope, than 100% of a business with 17 customers.

June 17, 2005 by in Oracle

Dell: Put that MacOS in my pipe and let me smoke it

Dell: Put that MacOS in my pipe and let me smoke it

So, maybe I wasn't so crazy after all when, the other day, I suggested that Dell might now be the perfect company to resell systems loaded with Apple's OS X now that Apple is cutting bait with IBM's PowerPC and switching to Intel chips.  According to a report in Fortune Magazine, Dell founder Michael Dell said "If Apple decides to open the Mac OS to others, we would be happy to offer it to our customers.

June 17, 2005 by in Dell

Maybe now, Intel's Centrino will offer a technical advantage

Maybe now, Intel's Centrino will offer a technical advantage

For years, Intel and I have been at odds over advantages of going with a Centrino-enabled notebook versus a non-Centrino notebook.  I've argued that Centrino is nothing more than a package of Intel-only parts that has so far proven to be no more competent at connecting to and using WiFi networks than similar packages with some non-Intel parts (in particular, the Wi-Fi radio).

June 17, 2005 by in Intel

Can your IT shop compete?

Can your IT shop compete?

Last week, I decided I wanted a new Moto Razr cell phone. I could have taken my purchasing card down to the Cingular store and gotten one that night, but I decided I'd play by the rules.

June 16, 2005 by in Mobility

Office of the future circa 2020

Office of the future circa 2020

Peering into the future, OfficeTeam, a staffing service for administrative professionals, published its research--"Office of the Future: 2020"--which doesn't offer much beyond the obvious predictions.  The report predicts that the future office will be "increasingly mobile and flexible as companies swiftly assemble the resources necessary to meet changing business needs.

June 16, 2005 by in Microsoft

IBM's blades:  Opteron is in da house

IBM's blades: Opteron is in da house

According to a story by News.com's Stephen Shankland, buyers of IBM's Bladecenters now have the option of selecting single or dual core Opterons as the processor on-board the server blades that go into a Bladecenter enclosure.

June 16, 2005 by in Hardware

Feature heap won't undo LAMP's toll on Microsoft

Feature heap won't undo LAMP's toll on Microsoft

You've heard of feature creep? The phenomenon that occurs, usually during the specification phase, when extraneous features somehow work their way into software in such a way that can make the resulting product either too complex or worse, impossible to use?

June 15, 2005 by in Windows

Leading by example

Leading by example

The recent U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report based on input from security personnel at 24 agencies warned that the federal government is not sufficiently addressing the threats brought by spam, phishing, and spyware.

June 15, 2005 by in Security

Windows XP installed-base still trailing that of Win2K

Windows XP installed-base still trailing that of Win2K

Although usage of Windows XP in businesses improved to 38 percent of business PCs in the 2005Q1, a recent study shows that nearly four years after that operating system originally shipped (October 2001), it still trails behind its predecessor Windows 2000, found in 48 percent of business PCs.   While a 10 percent difference doesn't sound like much, the change only marked a 6.

June 14, 2005 by in Windows

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