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Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet, covering cybersecurity, national security, policy and privacy. He is based out of the New York newsroom, and can also be found on sister sites CNET and CBS News. You can contact him with his PGP key: EB6CEEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

When society makes technical decisions

When society makes technical decisions

Britain's plans for a universal ID card  have suffered at the hands of of a London School of Economics report (PDF) that called into question the scheme's implementation.  Now, an organization called the Pledge Bank has started a campaign to build a legal defense fund for people who publicly declare that they'll refuse to register for the new ID card.

July 28, 2005 by in Data Management

Shining example of why patents and standards don't mix

Shining example of why patents and standards don't mix

I've routinely used ZDNet as a bully pulpit directed at both the sellers and buyers of technologies who look to establish or adopt certain standards that have patents connected to them.   When a proprietary (often patented) technology earns the status of de facto standard (aka: practically unchallenged market dominance), the licensor of that technology (usually the patent holder) is basically afforded a legal monopoly and an unprecedented amount of market control.

July 27, 2005 by in Legal

Views into Vista Beta 1

Views into Vista Beta 1

According to Windows head Jim Allchin, the first beta of Vista is not suitable for mere mortals. "Beta 1 is not what I would call deeply interesting, unless you are a real bithead.

July 27, 2005 by in Windows

On being bugged

On being bugged

Gilles Caprari of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne has developed a matchbook-size robot named Insbot. Insbot can secrete reassuring chemicals and has successfully insinuated itself into colonies of cockroaches.

July 27, 2005 by in Innovation

10 petaflops at your service

10 petaflops at your service

Next year, Japan plans to begin development of what it hopes will be the fastest of all supercomputers--73 times faster (10 petaflops: 1 petaflop is one thousand trillion floating point operations per second)  than IBM's top-ranked Blue Gene, according to an Japan Times story.  It may take up to $1 billion and five years to get there.

July 26, 2005 by in Tech Industry

Ohhh. The pain, the pain: The Bluetooth pain

Ohhh. The pain, the pain: The Bluetooth pain

If you read my recent post on how EV-DO saved the day during a recent heat-wave induced blackout in New England, then you'd know that I was accessing my company's corporate network through a virtual private network connection (VPN) that involved my Thinkpad T42 connected via Bluetooth to a Verizon Wireless (EV-DO)-provisioned  PocketPC-based Audiovox XV6600 smartphone.

July 25, 2005 by in Networking

Yahoo builds its desktop with widgets

Yahoo builds its desktop with widgets

I am a fan of widgets--simple, small, pleasantly graphical desktop applications that do everything from control the sound on your system and display time around the world to feed headlines and give the weather. Konfabulator started out doing cool widgets for the Mac (it also does Windows now), and then Apple decided it was a good idea and did itself for the Tiger release of the Mac OS.

July 25, 2005 by in Apple

Building customer interaction hubs

Building customer interaction hubs

Customer Interaction Hubs (CIH) are one of the things I've been thinking about a lot lately due to some consulting I've been doing.  If you're not familiar with the term, it's because it fairly far to the left on the Gartner Hype Cycle S-curve.

July 25, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

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