Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can securely reach him on Signal and WhatsApp at 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

Is Bluetooth past its prime?

Is Bluetooth past its prime?

For over five years, two of the supposedly killer wireless technologies -- Bluetooth and Wi-Fi -- have been marching to the beats of their own drummers.  Whereas before, the two wireless technologies had almost nothing in common with each other and were designed to address distinctly different needs, now the two technologies are addressing some of the same applications (wireless printing for example).

May 1, 2005 by in Networking

EnterpriseTenFold: Too good to be true?

EnterpriseTenFold: Too good to be true?

Jeffrey Walker makes some seemingly outrageous claims. The iconoclastic founder and CTO of TenFold asserts that business users can build high-end enterprise applications ten times faster with his application development platform than using other tools.

April 30, 2005 by in Developer

New vistas for consumer bootleggers

New vistas for consumer bootleggers

Japan continues to find innovative applications for consumer electronics with the increasingly common practice of "digital shoplifting"--using camera phones to take pictures of pages from magazines (notably recipes and other easily-imagined content). Separately, Samsung (ironically a manufacturer of camera phones) has banned them from its factories for fear they'll be used to steal trade secrets.

April 30, 2005 by in Mobility

TheFeature; a great model for IT vendor sponsorship

TheFeature; a great model for IT vendor sponsorship

Readers typically balk at vendor-sponsored content thinking that it will be automatically partial to the company backing it or it'll have that play-it-safe sterile feel to it that takes away more than it gives.  Such is not the case with TheFeature, a site sponsored by Nokia making sense of the fast and complex world of mobile technologies and trends.

April 29, 2005 by in Microsoft

Apple's Tiger takes a big bite out of tech coverage

Apple's Tiger takes a big bite out of tech coverage

You must have noticed that in days building up to Apple's OS X Tiger update, news stories, commentaries, reviews, and blogger posts about the software have appeared at every corner of the Internet. Now, that the culmination of the media frenzy has finally arrived---and the countdown on Apple's home page has finally ended---here a few worthwhile takes on the client and concurrent server release of Apple's latest operating system: Ars Technica: Mac OS X 10.

April 29, 2005 by in Apple

Oracle in talks to buy Siebel

Oracle in talks to buy Siebel

Oracle is in talks to buy Siebel Systems for a price tag that could reach $5 Billion The Daily Deal reports. The high-level discussions between the two companies have been confirmed by insiders and industry analysts, but are preliminary and could still break down, according to the news organization.

April 29, 2005 by in Oracle

IBM responds on OpenOffice contribution question

IBM responds on OpenOffice contribution question

The last blog on cell phones and cancer swallowed my day and I didn't get to the interesting and intriguing write up of IBM's Lotus Workplace client technologies that I said yesterday's blog (see Clearing the air on the IBM Workplace-OpenOffice.org connection) that I'd get to today.

April 28, 2005 by in IBM

Jobs' book banning backfiring

Jobs' book banning backfiring

Steve Jobs doesn't like what he read in the forthcoming biography entitled "iCon Steve Jobs: : The Greatest Second Act in the History of Business" (John Wiley & Sons, due out May 27) so he gave an order to rip out all of the publishers books (including popular titles like "Macs for Dummies") from Apple stores. It's currently #34 on the Amazon Top 100 list...

April 28, 2005 by in Apple

Political Identity

Political Identity

On the heels of the 2004 election, one of the things that candidates want is email addresses. Not just any email addresses, but email addresses of likely voters with particular persuasions in their district.

April 27, 2005 by in Amazon

Clearing the air on IBM Workplace-OpenOffice.org connection

Clearing the air on IBM Workplace-OpenOffice.org connection

Yesterday's blog entry by Joe Brockmeier about why he found the comments reported to have been made by Sun officials to be petty politics has drawn a response from Sun's Simon Phipps as well as a clarification to a blog I wrote on the issue from Open Source Diva Danese Cooper (formerly of Sun, now with Intel).  It has also flushed out some clarity over a connection that exists between IBM's Lotus Workplace and OpenOffice.

April 27, 2005 by in IBM

Is IBM close to avenging OS/2's death?

Is IBM close to avenging OS/2's death?

It's been almost 15 years since Microsoft jilted IBM's OS/2 at the altar, kicking Big Blue while it was already down (financially), and exacerbating the old school company's global state of disarray -- one that outsider (IBM's first ever) Lou Gerstner managed to turn around after he was brought on board in 1993.

April 27, 2005 by in IBM

Customers aren't so stupid after all

Customers aren't so stupid after all

James Coplien said some rather dramatic things at last week's ACCU conference, among them the following: There's a pressure that unless you're one of the first three players in the market you don't have a chance," said Coplien. "Quality is suffering for time--people pay money for the first, not the best.

April 26, 2005 by in Security

Is Sun right to insist on copyright transfer?

Is Sun right to insist on copyright transfer?

ZDNet blogger Joe Brockmeier has issued a stinging commentary that takes Sun to task for not practicing what it preaches.  In his blog, Brockmeier takes issue with the way certain Sun officials are saying that IBM should contribute developer hours to OpenOffice (based on usage) while Sun doesn't necessarily contribute to all of the open source projects it relies on.

April 26, 2005 by in Oracle

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All

Top Stories