Chris Jablonski

Christopher Jablonski is a freelance technology writer. Previously, he held research analyst positions in the IT industry and was the manager of marketing editorial at CBS Interactive. He's been contributing to ZDNet since 2003.</p> <p>Christopher received a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign. With over 12 years in IT, he's an expert on transformational technologies, particularly those influential in B2B.

Latest Posts

Is the Earth elastic?

Is the Earth elastic?

Scientists from Brazil and the U.S. think so. In a surprising discovery, they've found that a GPS station in Manaus, near the center of the Amazon River basin, showed that the Earth level was going up and down by almost 3 inches (75 mm) every year with the seasonal floods of the big river.

October 5, 2005 by in Amazon

Why study colloids on the ISS?

Why study colloids on the ISS?

Colloids are found almost everywhere, in butter, milk, aerosols or paints. But in space, they behave differently. And several experiments under progress aboard the International Space Station (ISS) could lead to new technologies, such as computers operating on light instead of electricity.

October 4, 2005 by in Innovation

Nanohelices for nanoscale sensors?

Nanohelices for nanoscale sensors?

New nanohelices created from zinc oxide and which bear a resemblance to the helical configuration of DNA discovered 50 years ago, could become a basis for creating nanoscale sensors, transducers, resonators and other devices that rely on electromechanical coupling.

September 30, 2005 by in CXO

Searching in 3-D

Searching in 3-D

Eighteen months ago, I was writing that shape searching could become a reality. Now, the researchers at Purdue University who developed this initial system are providing benchmarking tools to evaluate how well their search system is working.

September 29, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

This molecule walks like a man

This molecule walks like a man

Scientists have designed a molecule which, like a human, walks in a straight line on a flat surface, one step at a time. The fact that the motion is fully controllable might lead to applications in molecular computing, for example for storing large amounts of information on nanoscale chips.

September 27, 2005 by in Hardware

Don Quijote and the asteroids

Don Quijote and the asteroids

Don Quijote is the name of a space mission that will be launched in 2007 or later by the European Space Agency (ESA). The goal of this mission is to check if it's possible to modify the trajectory of an asteroid before it becomes a threat to Earth.

September 27, 2005 by in Innovation

Self-repairing spacecrafts

Self-repairing spacecrafts

NASA and CSIRO in Australia are working together to build future spacecrafts able to detect, diagnose and fix damage, whether inflicted by impacts or caused by equipment failures. Some practical applications should be deployed by 2015.

September 25, 2005 by in Innovation

The world's first single photon machine

The world's first single photon machine

Nanotechnologists at the University of Southern California (USC) are building a device dubbed the Einstein Emitter which will deliver a single photon produced by a single electron. Coupled with a detector, this will be the the first real-world photon computer system.

September 24, 2005 by in Mobility

Why leaves change color

Why leaves change color

Autumn starts officially tomorrow and we'll soon be able to look at all the marvelous colors of autumn leaves, at least if we live in a place where autumn means something. And now we know that a single protein is responsible for the splendor of the season.

September 21, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

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