Dion Hinchcliffe

Dion Hinchcliffe is an expert in information technology, business strategy, and next-generation enterprises. He is currently Chief Strategy Officer at the digital business transformation firm Adjuvi. A veteran of enterprise IT, Dion has been working for two decades with leading-edge methods to bridge the widening gap between business and technology. He has extensive practical experience with enterprise technologies and he consults, advises, and writes prolifically on social business, IT, and enterprise architecture. Dion still works in the trenches with clients in the Fortune 1000, government, and Internet startup community. He is also a sought-after keynote speaker and is co-author of several books on 2.0 subjects including Web 2.0 Architectures from O'Reilly as well as the best-selling Social Business By Design from John Wiley & Sons (May, 2012.)

Latest Posts

Salesforce Chatter: Social operating systems emerge on the IT stage

Salesforce Chatter: Social operating systems emerge on the IT stage

The next big shift: Intranets, portals, and software suites that are the integrating force of the social fabric for our organizations. This morning's announcement here at Dreamforce today from Salesforce of Chatter, an enterprise-class realization of Facebook and Twitter, is further evidence of the industry's push for social Web capabilities for business activities.

published November 18, 2009 by

Comments

Enterprise 2.0: What do we know today about moving our organizations into the 21st century?

Enterprise 2.0: What do we know today about moving our organizations into the 21st century?

This week in Frankfurt at the Enterprise 2.0 SUMMIT and last week at the inaugural Enterprise 2.0 Conference West in San Francisco has been an good microcosm of the state of the industry. It does appear that we're entering a new stage in the maturity of enterprise social computing. The good news: Most of the lessons learned are good ones, yet as we'll see, some challenges remain.

published November 11, 2009 by

Comments

Are the iPhone and social networks making the classic Web and intranet obsolete?

Are the iPhone and social networks making the classic Web and intranet obsolete?

There's been an important and relatively sudden change taking place over the last couple of years in the way that we interact with the Web. While direct access or search activity has been (and still is) the most common way that we access the content and applications of the Web, new ways have been rapidly growing and competing with how we work online, both at home and at work. These new models, exemplified by social networking sites like Facebook or mobile apps on platforms like the iPhone, Palm's new webOS, and Android, seems to be heralding a change in the way that we work with our IT systems in the enterprise.See what the implications are and what you can do about them.

published October 25, 2009 by

Comments

Twenty-two power laws of the emerging social economy

Twenty-two power laws of the emerging social economy

I take a look at twenty-two power laws that will drive forward your organization this year as we look at what will make business and IT successful in the 21st century. A detailed and descriptive dive into next-generation enterprises for the technical and business-oriented alike.

published October 5, 2009 by

Comments

Community management: The 'essential' capability of successful Enterprise 2.0 efforts

Community management: The 'essential' capability of successful Enterprise 2.0 efforts

It's not a skill that's been widely understood until quite recently, however community management has begun to move to the forefront of discussions about enterprise social computing as the use of social tools begins to climb the maturity curve. Now it's increasingly proving not just useful but a critical component of Enterprise 2.0 efforts despite an often vague understanding of what it is and where it should be situated in the org chart.

published September 28, 2009 by

Comments

Creating a unified model for enterprise mashups

Creating a unified model for enterprise mashups

I’ve written here over the years about software mashups; simple combinations of pieces of the Web that are rearranged into new useful forms. I've even called the approach a key to the future of software development. While mashups in the enterprise have been reasonably successful up until now, there have been challenges in enabling the same level of wide use and benefits that are currently evident on the open Web.The new Open Mashup Alliance and EMML will create a unified model for mashup development. i explore the details and implications of how OMA and EMML work.

published September 24, 2009 by

Comments

Going beyond the hype: Identifying Enterprise 2.0 best practices

Going beyond the hype: Identifying Enterprise 2.0 best practices

There’s been plenty of discussion recently in the blogosphere, including here, about the successes and challenges of Enterprise 2.0 projects. But there’s still just a rough general sense of what it really takes to create an effective collaborative community using social tools.However, as social computing patterns and best practices begin to emerge, we're starting to get a clearer idea of how to make Enterprise 2.0 efforts successful. Here's what we know so far.

published September 17, 2009 by

Comments

Government 2.0: A tale of "risk, control, and trust"

Government 2.0: A tale of "risk, control, and trust"

Yesterday in downtown Washington DC I was fortunate to be able to attend two important Government 2.0 events, the LMI Executive Forum on Mission 2.0 and O'Reilly's Government 2.0 Expo. Both of these events highlighted the benefits as well as the challenges of improving the way the government does so much of what it does.Here's what you need to know about Web 2.0 in government based on the discussions at these seminal events.

published September 9, 2009 by

Comments

How the Web OS has begun to reshape IT and business

How the Web OS has begun to reshape IT and business

These days in the halls of IT departments around the world there is a growing realization that the next wave of outsourcing, things like cloud computing and crowdsourcing, are going to require responses that will forever change the trajectory of their current relationship with the business, or finally cause them to be relegated as a primarily administrative, keep-the-lights-on function.Here's how the conception of the growing Web OS can describe how to strategically align our businesses with the world's largest marketplace.

published September 6, 2009 by

Comments

Enterprise 2.0: Finding success on the frontiers of social business

Enterprise 2.0: Finding success on the frontiers of social business

My recent exploration of the potential causes of Enterprise 2.0 failures here on ZDNet sparked a critical discussion in the blogosphere of enterprise social computing and its overall appropriateness, motivations, and benefits to business. In particular, well-known contrarian Dennis Howlett weighed in last week with fairly severe criticism of Enterprise 2.0 which ultimately resulted in a direct response from Andrew McAfee, coiner of the term.I recap the facts and the latest discussion and explain why social tools in the workplace, if history is any guide, are almost certainly inevitable.

published September 2, 2009 by

Comments

14 Reasons Why Enterprise 2.0 Projects Fail

14 Reasons Why Enterprise 2.0 Projects Fail

I’ve been having some very interesting conversations lately about Enterprise 2.0 failures with ZDNet colleague Michael Krigsman. He is doing research for his work on project failures in this area and is trying to understand the reasons why some Enterprise 2.0 initiatives don’t succeed. In preparing for our talk together, I ended up doing quite a bit of my own research and the results, at least for me, surfaced some fascinating stories and insights that are worth examining examining here in detail.

published August 21, 2009 by

Comments

Using social software to reinvent the customer relationship

Using social software to reinvent the customer relationship

As Web 2.0 applications move more deeply into the strategic operations of enterprises, a unique hybrid of social software has emerged to help businesses deal with the giant sea of customers that awaits them on the other side of the network. While Enterprise 2.0 tools, primarily aimed at collaboration, are certainly part of this story, they often don’t help companies enjoy the full range of possibilities when it comes customer-facing social computing. Enter the rapidly emerging Social CRM space, an area that’s become highly significant recently.

published August 18, 2009 by

Comments

Pragmatic new models for enterprise architecture take shape

Pragmatic new models for enterprise architecture take shape

Hear the words "enterprise architecture" and many people will turn away automatically. It's not that they aren't aware that technology drives so much of the modern world, they just think it doesn't apply to what they do. The famous IT/business divide is too often kept this way because of mutual incomprehension, not-invented-here thinking, and apparently incompatible mindsets. However, this is beginning to change.

published August 11, 2009 by

Comments

Assessing the Enterprise 2.0 marketplace in 2009: Robust and crowded

Assessing the Enterprise 2.0 marketplace in 2009: Robust and crowded

Social software platforms, including services such as Facebook and Twitter, have become one of the primary channels for communication amongst consumers this year, even eclipsing e-mail in some parts of the developed world.The same however, can’t quite be said yet for the workplace. While the adoption numbers for social applications are still impressive in business (about half of all large organizations), actual adoption and use is lagging significantly behind the non-business world as organizations take the time to assess a range of issues with enterprise social computing, including appropriateness, security, control, management methods, and roll-out strategies.The choices of social tools these days can be daunting and are only increasing rapidly, with new entries appearing weekly and existing ones being upgraded often. What’s increasingly needed is a detailed look at what’s currently available in business-class social software and how it sizes up, which we’ll try to do in high-level form here.

published July 29, 2009 by

Comments

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.

Top Stories