Jack Schofield

Jack Schofield spent the 1970s editing photography magazines before becoming editor of an early UK computer magazine, Practical Computing. In 1983, he started writing a weekly computer column for the Guardian, and joined the staff to launch the newspaper's weekly computer supplement in 1985. This section launched the Guardian’s first website and, in 2001, its first real blog. When the printed section was dropped after 25 years and a couple of reincarnations, he felt it was a time for a change....

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Meg Whitman could land CEO role in HP soap opera

Meg Whitman could land CEO role in HP soap opera

Anyone stuck for a new soap opera -- perhaps something like Dallas but with smaller shoulderpads -- could certainly find inspiration in the upper echelons of Hewlett-Packard, the founding company of Silicon Valley. Those who have already been entertained by the Carly Fiorina saga and the ousting of Mark Hurd might now be looking forward to a new mini-series where Meg Whitman replaces the current boss Léo Apotheker.

September 21, 2011 by in Tech Industry

Booting Windows 8 in 2 seconds

Booting Windows 8 in 2 seconds

Microsoft has been explaining its efforts to make Windows 8 start up faster, and with suitable hardware, it's now possible to get the boot time below 2 seconds. This is unlikely to make a huge difference to Windows 7 users, who should already enjoy boot times of around 15 to 45 seconds with conventional hard drives.

September 9, 2011 by in Tech Industry

Windows 7 converging slowly on Windows XP

Windows 7 converging slowly on Windows XP

Microsoft Windows 7 has now taken 30 percent of the PC operating system market, but it's still a long way behind Windows XP's 52 percent, according to numbers published today on the Netmarketshare website. As the name implies, the market shares are calculated from website traffic, and thus may not precisely reflect the global installed base.

September 1, 2011 by in Tech Industry

Obituary: Tony Sale, Colossus rebuilder

Obituary: Tony Sale, Colossus rebuilder

Many visitors to Bletchley Park, home of the UK's code-breaking efforts during World War II, must have enjoyed meeting Tony Sale, who appeared to spend much of his free time tending Colossus. This was a reconstructed version of one of the world's first electronic computers, which was built out of valves (or vacuum tubes) to help decode messages that the German forces had encrypted using the Lorenz cypher [corrected].

August 30, 2011 by in Tech Industry

Samsung not buying; HP not quitting PC business

Samsung not buying; HP not quitting PC business

Samsung Electronics has said it's not buying Hewlett-Packard's PC business, and since companies can often deny what they are up to, it has now said it twice. Meanwhile, HP has had to issue statements to say it is not exiting the PC business, an impression that might have been gained from some shoddy reporting.

August 26, 2011 by in Tech Industry

Splitting HP's PC business would help sale

Splitting HP's PC business would help sale

Hewlett-Packard is the world's largest personal computer company, and this makes it hard for any of the smaller suppliers to buy its PC business. However, Taiwan's DigiTimes has suggested a possible solution: split the business into consumer and enterprise divisions, and sell off the consumer division.

August 23, 2011 by in Tech Industry

PC sales slump in the UK and Europe, says Gartner

PC sales slump in the UK and Europe, says Gartner

Netbook shipments in Western Europe halved in this year's second quarter, with problems at the market-leading Acer contributing to a major market slump, according to Gartner's provisional estimates. The industry research company reckons that, in this geographical area, PC shipments fell by 18.

August 17, 2011 by in Tech Industry

iPad 3 launch "cancelled" due to display problems

iPad 3 launch "cancelled" due to display problems

Apple hasn't announced this year's launch of the iPad 3, but even if it had been going to, it won't now. Apple has "recently canceled its iPad 3 supply schedule for the second half of 2011," according to Taiwan's DigiTimes, partly because Sharp cannot manufacture enough high-resolution LCD screens.

August 16, 2011 by in Tech Industry

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