Lucy Sherriff

<p>Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. And so here we are. </p>

Latest Posts

Teleporting electrons for game of quantum ping pong

Teleporting electrons for game of quantum ping pong

Teleporting electrons between two points on a wire is just the kind of high end juggling act that deserves some applause. And since it is also the latest nifty trick being hailed as the "first major step on the road to building a quantum computer", it is the kind of trick worth mentioning here.

published September 22, 2011 by

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Room temp spintronics breakthrough in Japan?

Room temp spintronics breakthrough in Japan?

ZDNet’s own Rupert Goodwins once told me that he liked to say "room temperature" in the hearing of spintronics researchers, just to see their faces fall.But increasingly, spintronics researchers are talking about real room temperature experiments, and we have another example for you.

published September 21, 2011 by

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Ferroelectric capacitors promise ultra-cool computers

Ferroelectric capacitors promise ultra-cool computers

Good news from the research labs of the University of California, Berkeley: the scientists buried deep within the University’s electrical engineering department might have found a way to cool all our computers down, and get us back on the Moore’s Law highway.(And speaking as someone whose laptop keyboard is currently almost too hot to type on, this news seems very good indeed).

published September 14, 2011 by

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Graphene auditions for lead in Terahertz productions

Graphene auditions for lead in Terahertz productions

Two teams of US researchers have got their eye on graphene to advance the state of the art in medical imaging, communications and security screening, thanks to its strong response to the terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum.Writing in Nature Nanotechnology, scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley, explain how nanoribbons of graphene could form the "beginnings of a toolset" for working with terahertz radiation.

published September 13, 2011 by

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Graphene contemplates career as perfect photodetector

Graphene contemplates career as perfect photodetector

One of graphene’s more intriguing qualities is that it is capable of absorbing light of any colour. This makes it less useful than silicon for making logic switches, because it is hard to switch off, but means it might just make a name for itself in solar panels.

published September 6, 2011 by

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Researchers début combined quantum processor and RAM

Researchers début combined quantum processor and RAM

Californian researchers have combined quantum memory with a quantum processor for the first time, making a quantum chip based on von Neumann architecture. The chip needs to be cooled to within a whisker of absolute zero to work, but the work has brought programmable quantum RAM - a "key component" of a future quantum computer – into the real world.

published September 4, 2011 by

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Record low quantum computer error rates from NIST

Record low quantum computer error rates from NIST

NIST, the US’s National Institute of Standards and Technology, has announced a new record for accuracy in quantum computing, albeit for just a single qubit.The researchers report an error rate that for the first time is low enough to meet (and in fact exceed) the theoretical standards needed to build the machines.

published September 1, 2011 by

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Graphene gets sticky, thanks Van der Waals

Graphene gets sticky, thanks Van der Waals

Graphene can add unusual stickiness to its list of amazing properties. The two dimensional wonder material, set to take over the world thanks to its conductivity, strength, stiffness, thinness and so on (as long as all our research institutions can get themselves in gear), has also been shown to have "ultrastrong adhesion".

published August 25, 2011 by

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Graphene on the brain, thanks to $500k grant

Graphene on the brain, thanks to $500k grant

Whether you make the stuff out of girls scout cookies or flake it off a chunk of graphite, miracle material graphene could soon be coming to an neural implant near you.Researchers in the US have been given almost half a million dollars to work graphene – which they think will be more stable than traditional materials – into implantable electrode systems.

published August 9, 2011 by

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Add freedom for quantum circuitry simplicity

Add freedom for quantum circuitry simplicity

It might not quite “pave the way” for quantum computers, (every research announcement claims it will do just that) but a new approach to quantum circuitry reported by researchers at Bristol University might show a way around a significant obstacle.Quantum circuits, the researchers explain, are extraordinarily complex things.

published August 3, 2011 by

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