Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and SmartPlanet as well as Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic.

Rachel King

Rachel King is a staff writer for ZDNet based in San Francisco.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker writes for ZDNet, CNET, and CBS News. He is based in New York City.

Latest Posts

Bringing order to Threat Chaos

IT security expert Richard Stiennon joins our expanding team of expert bloggers this week. Richard, whose impressive resume includes stints at Webroot Software (VP of threat research) and Gartner Inc.

March 1, 2006 by

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StepMail: Stepping through email

Microsoft Research must have a lot of spare cycles, or members of the group have figured out a way to combine mild dance exercise and email browsing. StepMail works with the kind of dance pad used in video games, and users move their feet to read and delete emails.

February 28, 2006 by Dan Farber

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VMWare Player triggers Windows Activation process

If you've followed any of my blogs regarding VMWare's VMWare Workstation and the runtime it's now giving away for free, then you'd know by now that I'm highly recommending to anyone with a brand new machine that the first thing they should do is load VMWare Workstation on it and then create a bunch of distinctly separate virtual machines (each running Windows for most people), and then, you divide your tasks across those virtual machines.

February 27, 2006 by David Berlind

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Gardening and the blogosphere

IT Facts cites a recent Gallup poll about blogs:  Just 9% of Internet users read blogs frequently, 11% do so occasionally, 13% rarely bother, and 66% never do.Jason Fry's article in the WSJ [free access] puts the Gallup poll in perspective and shows how Daniel Gross's Slate article on the "Twilight of the Blogs" falls short of capturing what is going on with blogs and new media.

February 27, 2006 by Dan Farber

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Of pigeons, rats and SMS

New Scientist (February 4, 2006) reports that, continuing a tradition that goes back to ancient Egypt, pigeons may soon be used to transmit messages--specifically, SMS messages. UC Irvine researcher Beatrice da Costa is developing a miniature backpack with cell phone circuitry and sensors that detect carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide.

February 27, 2006 by Ed Gottsman

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